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A big chunk of the trades that happen in shares are sold short. In other words, the trader takes a punt that the price will go down. In effect you sell something that you don’t own yet – like shares in the company – and you sell it to some mug who buys it off you at today’s price. Then when the price has gone down, you buy it at the lower price and deliver on your promise. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether short selling is destructive, or is it a useful balance that keeps share trading in check?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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A big chunk of the trades that happen in shares are sold short. In other words, the trader takes a punt that the price will go down. In effect you sell something that you don’t own yet – like shares in the company – and you sell it to some mug who buys it off you at today’s price. Then when the price has gone down, you buy it at the lower price and deliver on your promise. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether short selling is destructive, or is it a useful balance that keeps share trading in check?

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London and the southeast accounts for a third of the UK’s gross disposable household income. The rest of the country somehow scrapes by. But it’s clear to see why. The proximity to other businesses means investment in London creates a greater return than any other region. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether the government should be involved more in regional investment, or will the laws of economics sort it out for itself.

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London and the southeast accounts for a third of the UK’s gross disposable household income. The rest of the country somehow scrapes by. But it’s clear to see why. The proximity to other businesses means investment in London creates a greater return than any other region. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether the government should be involved more in regional investment, or will the laws of economics sort it out for itself.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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Modern Monetary Theory states that’s, because the government of a country is the monopoly supplier of money, it has an unlimited capacity to pay for things and provide funds for other sectors. If the theory is right, why not provide enough money to ensure there is full employment, so full use is made of available labour? Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether he is a supporter of MMT. It seems he is, in part, but departs from the ideology when it comes to the theory relating to exports and imports.

This is a FREE episode of the Debunking Economics podcast. To hear other podcasts in full subscribe at http://debunkingeconomics.com

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Figures out in the US last week showed the unemployment rate had dropped to just 4.5 percent, a long way from the 10% rate back in 2009. Yet Donald Trump won an election, in part, because he was there to protect jobs for Americans. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen What’s the problem when so many seem to be gainfully employed? The answer, it seems, is that you can do anything you want with statistics. Take a look at this graph to see his point: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/graph/?g=djl1

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Figures out in the US last week showed the unemployment rate had dropped to just 4.5 percent, a long way from the 10% rate back in 2009. Yet Donald Trump won an election, in part, because he was there to protect jobs for Americans. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen What’s the problem when so many seem to be gainfully employed? The answer, it seems, is that you can do anything you want with statistics. Take a look at this graph to see his point: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/graph/?g=djl1

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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Mark Perry, Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Michigan, believes that raising the minimum wage will push costs up so high companies won’t be able to afford them. He wrote, “a $15 minimum wage maximizes the probability that an unskilled worker will be unemployed at $0.00 an hour instead of being gainfully employed”. So, is that the case? Prof Steve Keen argues he is making the mistake of many economists, applying a micro-economic argument to macro-economics. Find out how the Michigan professor got it so wrong.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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Mark Perry, Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Michigan, believes that raising the minimum wage will push costs up so high companies won’t be able to afford them. He wrote in his blog, “a $15 minimum wage maximizes the probability that an unskilled worker will be unemployed at $0.00 an hour instead of being gainfully employed”. So, is that the case? Prof DSteve Keen argues he is making the mistake of many economists, applying a micro-economic argument to macro-economics. Find out how the Michigan professor got it so wrong.

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Latest UK employment statistics show that more than half of the jobs added in the last year went to the self-employed. Part of this will be entrepreneurs forging their own path, but many will be people forced to establish themselves as sole traders and work for companies on a more casual basis. In this podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the benefits and problems with the gig economy. On issue, of course, is the amount of money people make. Could the gig economy force a universal basic income?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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