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December 13, 2018

128. Will banks ever behave?

Banks were bailed out during the financial crisis in 2008. In the US the Treasury bought billions in mortgage backed securities. In the UK half a trillion pounds was allocated to a bank rescue package. The government took a 58 percent stake in RBS and remains a significant shareholder to this day. The industry that paid fat cat salaries through dodgy loans was saved by taxpayers. So, as long as they know they are ‘too big to fail’, what’s to stop banks continuing to adopt risky practises in the race for short term financial gain? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about how to moderate the behaviour of banks for the good of society.

December 13, 2018

128. Will banks ever behave?

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Banks were bailed out during the financial crisis in 2008. In the US the treasury bought billions in mortgage backed securities. In the UK half a trillion pounds was allocated to a bank rescue package. The government took a 58 percent stake in RBS and remains a significant shareholder to this day. The industry that paid fat cat salaries through dodgy loans was saved by taxpayers. So, as long as they know they are ‘too big to fail’, what’s to stop banks continuing to adopt risky practises in the race for short term financial gain? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about how to moderate the behaviour of banks for the good of society.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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House prices have started to fall in Australia. In Sydney they’ve fallen 10 percent in a year – Steve Keen isn’t alone in predicting they’ll fall as much again, at least. He tells Phil Dobbie that we’re already seeing the consequences of the fall, with Australian GDP falling. But will it lead to a recession. Could the consequences really be called a crisis, or will the economy absorb the shock? And, beyond Australia, which other countries are carrying unsustainable levels of household debt?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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House prices have started to fall in Australia. In Sydney they’ve fallen 10 percent in a year – Steve Keen isn’t alone in predicting they’ll fall as much again, at least. He tells Phil Dobbie that we’re already seeing the consequences of the fall, with Australian GDP falling. But will it lead to a recession. Could the consequences really be called a crisis, or will the economy absorb the shock? And, beyond Australia, which other countries are carrying unsustainable levels of household debt?

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One for our listeners, Pieter Verhoeven, suggested we look at steady state economics and the post-growth economy.

Can society continue to prosper without the need, or ability, for economic growth. Since the late sixties the Club of Rome has been arguing that we will need to curb growth or deplete the world’s resources. How would we adapt. Phil points to changes made to use resources more effectively – but does that mean we just consume more as a result? What needs to change if we are to accept the findings in Limits to Growth and what would life be like in a zero growth economy?

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One for our listeners, Pieter Verhoeven, suggested we look at steady state economics and the post-growth economy.

Can society continue to prosper without the need, or ability, for economic growth. Since the late sixties the Club of Rome has been arguing that we will need to curb growth or deplete the world’s resources. How would we adapt. Phil points to changes made to use resources more effectively – but does that mean we just consume more as a result? What needs to change if we are to accept the findings in Limits to Growth and what would life be like in a zero growth economy?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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According to NASA ninety-seven percent of climate scientists believe that climate change is the result of human activities. Only one US President doesn’t agree, denying that climate change even exists.  But a group of central bankers met recently to decide whether they had a role to play in fixing the mess we’re making of the planet. In today’s Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether central banks have contributed to the problem, and how far they’d have to shift their reasoning if they want to turn around and be helpful.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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According to NASA ninety-seven percent of climate scientists believe that climate change is the result of human activities. Only one US President doesn’t agree, denying that climate change even exists.  But a group of central bankers met recently to decide whether they had a role to play in fixing the mess we’re making of the planet. In today’s Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether central banks have contributed to the problem, and how far they’d have to shift their reasoning if they want to turn around and be helpful.

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In the UK we’ve privatised the railways, coach companies, the banks, power, airports, Royal Mail, water, BNT, car companies – there’s not much left to sell. But how are these privatised companies working out for us? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the arguments for and against privatisation. Obviously, too much in state hands is also problematic – so where is the happy compromise?

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In the UK we’ve privatised the railways, coach companies, the banks, power, airports, Royal Mail, water, BNT, car companies – there’s not much left to sell. But how are these privatised companies working out for us? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the arguments for and against privatisation. Obviously, too much in state hands is also problematic – so where is the happy compromise?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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