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UKIP released its manifesto this week. It’s a glossy production with a range of arguments designed to appeal to the disenfranchised UK worker. But do they stack up economically? In this podcast Phil Dobbie talks with Professor Steve Keen about some of their plans, including zero net migration, changes to VAT, getting rid of inheritance tax, redirecting foreign aid to the NHS and ways of helping small business. It’s fair to say they get a mixed report card from Steve, but some of their ideas are worth considering. Major parties, take note.

This is a free episode of the Debunking Economics podcast. To hear more episodes, subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Conventional neoclassic economics assumes the economy will always arrive at an equilibrium, yet central banks spend an inordinate amount of time speculating on when they should next move interest rates, and in what direction. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether interest rate decisions are intended to achieve and if they have their desired effect. We talk about this as the US Federal reserve prepares itself for one, possibly two, more interest rate rises this year.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Conventional neoclassic economics assumes the economy will always arrive at an equilibrium, yet central banks spend an inordinate amount of time speculating on when they should next move interest rates, and in what direction. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether interest rate decisions are intended to achieve and if they have their desired effect. We talk about this as the US Federal reserve prepares itself for one, possibly two, more interest rate rises this year.

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A Debunking Economics listener asked for a podcast on the role of Shadow Banks. In particular, he wanted to know if shadow banks create money in the same way as conventional banks. The quick answer is, no, because they are not able to create deposits – but they do increase the ability for banks to extend more loans. Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the role of shadow banks and asks, do they need to be curtailed? And, if so, how? It’s an issue that’s been flagged by Janet Yellen, Governor of the Federal Reserve in the US, who flagged that the influence of shadow banking on the financial system is hard to measure.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

A Debunking Economics listener asked for a podcast on the role of Shadow Banks. In particular, he wanted to know if shadow banks create money in the same way as conventional banks. The quick answer is, no, because they are not able to create deposits – but they do increase the ability for banks to extend more loans. Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the role of shadow banks and asks, do they need to be curtailed? And, if so, how? It’s an issue that’s been flagged by Janet Yellen, Governor of the Federal Reserve in the US, who flagged that the influence of shadow banking on the financial system is hard to measure.

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Economists have always seen wealth as a function of capital and labour. In effect, people and machines create things which makes them money. But Steve Keen believes there’s a far more important consideration – energy. In this free edition of the Debunking Economics podcast he points out how the industrial revolution was founded on the availability of energy and ongoing wealth creation is being driven by the more efficient use of energy.

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Today, on the Debunking economics podcast, imagine if shares had a use by date. If you pass the shares issued by a company on to a secondary market, the clock starts ticking. What would that do to the valuation of shares – and why do we need to worry about it? Phil Dobbie discusses the concept with Professor Steve Keen, investigating what the impact would be on share markets and the companies that trade on them.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Today, on the Debunking economics podcast, imagine if shares had a use by date. If you pass the shares issued by a company on to a secondary market, the clock starts ticking. What would that do to the valuation of shares – and why do we need to worry about it? Phil Dobbie discusses the concept with Professor Steve Keen, investigating what the impact would be on share markets and the companies that trade on them.

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A big chunk of the trades that happen in shares are sold short. In other words, the trader takes a punt that the price will go down. In effect you sell something that you don’t own yet – like shares in the company – and you sell it to some mug who buys it off you at today’s price. Then when the price has gone down, you buy it at the lower price and deliver on your promise. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether short selling is destructive, or is it a useful balance that keeps share trading in check?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

Premium

A big chunk of the trades that happen in shares are sold short. In other words, the trader takes a punt that the price will go down. In effect you sell something that you don’t own yet – like shares in the company – and you sell it to some mug who buys it off you at today’s price. Then when the price has gone down, you buy it at the lower price and deliver on your promise. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether short selling is destructive, or is it a useful balance that keeps share trading in check?

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