Debunking Economics - the podcast

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25. Is your money safe in the bank. Or is it time to buy gold? (preview)

February 20th, 2017

You’ve probably seen them – emails telling you now is the time to buy gold. When currencies collapse, gold is the safe-haven that speculators turn to. In this episode, Phil Dobbie explores the idea of stocking up with gold, with Professor Steve Keen. Is gold safer than keeping money in a bank? Is it premature to buy gold right now? What are the signs that an economic downturn and banking crisis is occurring? But buying gold isn’t the answer – reducing your level of debt is.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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25. Is your money safe in the bank. Or is it time to buy gold?

February 20th, 2017

You’ve probably seen them – emails telling you now is the time to buy gold. When currencies collapse, gold is the safe-haven that speculators turn to. In this episode, Phil Dobbie explores the idea of stocking up with gold, with Professor Steve Keen. Is gold safer than keeping money in a bank? Is it premature to buy gold right now? What are the signs that an economic downturn and banking crisis is occurring? But buying gold isn’t the answer – reducing your level of debt is.

24. Do Banks Really Work for Us? (preview)

February 13th, 2017

It’s very easy to look at the big salaries in the city and compare it to the average wage and assume bankers are taking us for a ride. But, for time immemorial we have needed money as a more effective means of trade than bartering. Who wants a chicken egg in exchange for today’s paper? So, banks emerged as the intermediary that enables trade. But, as Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie, banks don’t just act as an intermediary, they also create money, and focus on encouraging us all to build up debt. So, can we regulate banks to ensure they work in ways which are best for the community? Part of the answer, says Steve, is to see them focus more on equity than loans.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

00:0000:00

24. Do Banks Really Work for Us?

February 13th, 2017

It’s very easy to look at the big salaries in the city and compare it to the average wage and assume bankers are taking us for a ride. But, for time immemorial we have needed money as a more effective means of trade than bartering. Who wants a chicken egg in exchange for today’s paper? So, banks emerged as the intermediary that enables trade. But, as Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie, banks don’t just act as an intermediary, they also create money, and focus on encouraging us all to build up debt. So, can we regulate banks to ensure they work in ways which are best for the community? Part of the answer, says Steve, is to see them focus more on equity than loans.

23. How does the government choose to spend? (preview)

February 7th, 2017

Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen about the role of public sector spending. We’ve learnt that the government can create money, through its central bank, and this is, in effect, pumping new money into the economy. The alternate approaches, tax increases or austerity, pull money out of the economy. So public sector spending is a good thing, particularly when the economy is experiencing hardship – but how do they determine what’s best to spend money on. Aren’t government’s notoriously bad at decided how and where to inject funds? Isn’t there a need to focus on productivity rather than pushing up wages?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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23. How does the government choose to spend?

February 7th, 2017

Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen about the role of public sector spending. We’ve learnt that the government can create money, through its central bank, and this is, in effect, pumping new money into the economy. The alternate approaches, tax increases or austerity, pull money out of the economy. So public sector spending is a good thing, particularly when the economy is experiencing hardship – but how do they determine what’s best to spend money on. Aren’t government’s notoriously bad at decided how and where to inject funds? Isn’t there a need to focus on productivity rather than pushing up wages?

22. Fixing the Issue of Hereditary Wealth (preview)

January 30th, 2017

The rich poor gap in modern society isn’t just related to income. In fact, recent statistics in the UK point to a narrowing of the income gap since the financial crisis. The bigger issue is the inheritance of wealth, giving some a head start and inflating house prices beyond the reach of many. In this edition Phil Dobbie asks Prof. Steve Keen whether a heftier inheritance tax is the answer. There’s discussion of the problems with that approach, how land tax is similarly distortionary, and a suggestion of a better way of narrowing the gap – but we’d better do something about it, before civil unrest reaches fever pitch.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

00:0000:00

22. Fixing the Issue of Hereditary Wealth

January 30th, 2017

The rich poor gap in modern society isn’t just related to income. In fact, recent statistics in the UK point to a narrowing of the income gap since the financial crisis. The bigger issue is the inheritance of wealth, giving some a head start and inflating house prices beyond the reach of many. In this edition Phil Dobbie asks Prof. Steve Keen whether a heftier inheritance tax is the answer. There’s discussion of the problems with that approach, how land tax is similarly distortionary, and a suggestion of a better way of narrowing the gap – but we’d better do something about it, before civil unrest reaches fever pitch.

21. Why Trump Will Fail, Then U-Turn

January 22nd, 2017

Trump’s Presidency created optimism for many – those looking for work and investors who expect his infrastructure program will create untold wealth for the entire population. He reinforced that promise in his inaugural address, talking of new roads and highways and bridges, and the wall of course.

Professor Steve Keen is a big supporter of this plan, but believes it’ll fail for one simple reason. The plan is accompanied by a determination to return the budget to surplus, pulling money out of the US economy and countering any benefits from his infrastructure plans.

He talks to Phil Dobbie about his change in attitude to Trump’s administration – and what he think will happen next, including a recession in 2018.

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20. May’s Got the Wrong Plan For Brexit

January 18th, 2017

Journalist Phil Dobbie and economist Steve Keen agree on lots of things, but fall on either side of the Brexit camp. One believes Britain should have remained to fight EU bureaucracy from the inside, the other suggests the community is fundamentally flawed, along with the concept of free trade, and will collapse soon anyway.

In this FREE podcast Phil questions Steve on whether, irrespective of the ideology, Brexit will inflict a lot of short term hurt on many of those who voted for it. There’s also discussion on Theresa May’s 12 point plan, which both agree seems to ignore the opportunity and focuses on making the mistakes of the European partnership in other parts of the world.

In other words, will Theresa May just make things worse?

To hear more podcasts from Steve and Phil subscribe by picking a plan i nthe right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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