Premium

Politicians, the media and most economists are obsessed with government debt – now more so than ever. But, as Modern Monetary Theory has shown, there is no issue with governments perpetually running budgets in the red, providing the extra money supply resulting from it is not inflationary. This week Phil Dobbie suggests some of the debt issued in the form of bonds could be given to the public as a form of universal income, which increases when government debt is highest – when the economy is in most trouble.  So, what does Steve Keen think of this approach – and are there any downsides to the introduction of People’s Bonds?

Politicians, the media and most economists are obsessed with government debt – now more so than ever. But, as Modern Monetary Theory has shown, there is no issue with governments perpetually running budgets in the red, providing the extra money supply resulting from it is not inflationary. This week Phil Dobbie suggests some of the debt issued in the form of bonds could be given to the public as a form of universal income, which increases when government debt is highest – when the economy is in most trouble.  So, what does Steve Keen think of this approach – and are there any downsides to the introduction of People’s Bonds?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Would a job guarantee resolve the battle between inflation and unemployment? Conventional economists argue that when the labour market is tight – and there are few jobs to go around – people ask for more money and that creates inflation. When there are very few jobs – like now – inflation is much lower. The counter argument, from Modern Monetary Theorists, is that a job guarantee would reduce this flux, whilst improving the lifestyles and wellbeing of the population. This week Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether the MMT have got the logic right and, even if they have, can it be practically applied?

Would a job guarantee resolve the battle between inflation and unemployment? Conventional economists argue that when the labour market is tight – and there are few jobs to go around – people ask for more money and that creates inflation. When there are very few jobs – like now – inflation is much lower. The counter argument, from Modern Monetary Theorists, is that a job guarantee would reduce this flux, whilst improving the lifestyles and wellbeing of the population. This week Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether the MMT have got the logic right and, even if they have, can it be practically applied?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

The US Federal reserve this week indicated that interest rates will remain close to zero through till 2023, at the earliest. Why because inflation is subdued and they don’t expect it to pick up until employment returns to normal. But what’s normal? Central banks work on the principle of NAIRU - the nonaccelerating inflation rate of unemployment – but they never seem to be able top in down exactly what that rate is. Before the pandemic US unemployment was down to 3.5 percent, with no sign of inflation lifting. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether the idea of a fixed NAIRU rate just plain wrong?

The US Federal reserve this week indicated that interest rates will remain close to zero through till 2023, at the earliest. Why because inflation is subdued and they don’t expect it to pick up until employment returns to normal. But what’s normal? Central banks work on the principle of NAIRU - the nonaccelerating inflation rate of unemployment – but they never seem to be able top in down exactly what that rate is. Before the pandemic US unemployment was down to 3.5 percent, with no sign of inflation lifting. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether the idea of a fixed NAIRU rate just plain wrong?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

There are the deniers who will argue that mankind has no influence on climate, but worse yet, there are economists who argue the impact will be so small the cost of trying to prevent it will be far greater than the consequences of living with it. That’s the line taken by joint Nobel prizewinner William Nordhaus. In this week’s edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Prof Steve Keen takes Phil Dobbie through some of the spurious arguments and assumptions used by Nordhaus to reach his spurious conclusions. Some of them defy logic. If you offered them in a high school science exam, you’d probably fail.

This is a FREE episode. Subscribe to hear more episodes in full.

There's a video of this week's podcast on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfW4R_RcyJ0

Premium

In Japan Shinzo Abe has announced he is stepping aside because of ill health. Will this mark the end of Abenomics, the term used to describe his three-pronged approach to fighting the country’s ailing growth rate and deflation? Some point to the continued slow growth as a sign that his approach hasn’t worked, but on today’s podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie, things would have been much worse with a more conventional approach. Japan is an example of Modern Monetary Theory in action, and for those who believe pumping money into the system will create inflation like in Venezuela, why hasn’t this happened in Japan where deflation has been the biggest concern?

In Japan Shinzo Abe has announced he is stepping aside because of ill health. Will this mark the end of Abenomics, the term used to describe his three-pronged approach to fighting the country’s ailing growth rate and deflation? Some point to the continued slow growth as a sign that his approach hasn’t worked, but on today’s podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie, things would have been much worse with a more conventional approach. Japan is an example of Modern Monetary Theory in action, and for those who believe pumping money into the system will create inflation like in Venezuela, why hasn’t this happened in Japan where deflation has been the biggest concern?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Governments the world over are spending like crazy to try and steer their economies through the COVID-19 crisis. Whether it’s the fiscal policies of the government or the monetary policies of the central bank, it all still revolves around using money that wasn’t around a few months ago. So how much of what is happening is described by Modern Monetary Theory – and how much more could be done if we accepted that MMT is the way things should really work. And do central banks, or treasurers really understand it? Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether MMT can solve the COVID-19 debt problem?

This is a free episode of the podcast. To hear all podcasts in full subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Load more

Play this podcast on Podbean App