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A new law in New Zealand prevents foreign buyers from acquiring homes in there. It’s a response to rising house prices which, the government claims, is being driven by New Zealanders being outbid by people from overseas. Home ownership in New Zealand is now at its lowest level since 1951. So, will the plan work? Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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A new law in New Zealand prevents foreign buyers from acquiring homes in there. It’s a response to rising house prices which, the government claims, is being driven by New Zealanders being outbid by people from overseas. Home ownership in New Zealand is now at its lowest level since 1951. So, will the plan work? Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen.

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The spread of yield between short and long term US Treasuries is narrowing. It could even invert, meaning the yield is higher on short term Treasuries than long dated ones. This is precisely what happened prior to every US recession – so does that mean another is on the way. A listener to the podcast wrote asking why yield curve inversion is such a reliable indicator of recession, if indeed it is? Phil Dobbie gives a quick explanation of what yield curves are, and Prof Steve Keen gives his reasoning on why it is flattening in the US right now. And does it mean a recession is on the way?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

The spread of yield between short and long term US Treasuries is narrowing. It could even invert, meaning the yield is higher on short term Treasuries than long dated ones. This is precisely what happened prior to every US recession – so does that mean another is on the way. A listener to the podcast wrote asking why yield curve inversion is such a reliable indicator of recession, if indeed it is? Phil Dobbie gives a quick explanation of what yield curves are, and Prof Steve Keen gives his reasoning on why it is flattening in the US right now. And does it mean a recession is on the way?

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Robinson Crusoe lives on a desert island with Man Friday. There’s no need for money. But then Woman Saturday comes along, selling goods that both men want to acquire, and they devise the concept of money, which she quickly grabs the lions share of. Next, they discover a large village on the other side of the island. How does that change the value of their three-person economy when they introduce an island-wide currency? Then, when they find a neighbouring island with a very productive economy, what is their money worth now? Phil Dobbie takes Prof Steve Keen through a series of hypotheticals, to understand the role money plays, right from its origins.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Robinson Crusoe lives on a desert island with Man Friday. There’s no need for money. But then Woman Saturday comes along, selling goods that both men want to acquire, and they devise the concept of money, which she quickly grabs the lions share of. Next, they discover a large village on the other side of the island. How does that change the value of their three-person economy when they introduce an island-wide currency? Then, when they find a neighbouring island with a very productive economy, what is their money worth now? Phil Dobbie takes Prof Steve Keen through a series of hypotheticals, to understand the role money plays, right from its origins.

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He is running the only country in the G7 to see economic growth accelerate right now. His followers support him however much mud is slung his way. World leaders seem to be know towing to his demands for better trade deals, even though some would argue it smacks of protectionism. So, is Donald Trump doing a good job for America. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Professor Steve Keen describes the US as a Mad Max economy – he tells Phil Dobbie the benefits will be short lived. Listen to find out why.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

He is running the only country in the G7 to see economic growth accelerate right now. His followers support him however much mud is slung his way. World leaders seem to be know towing to his demands for better trade deals, even though some would argue it smacks of protectionism. So, is Donald Trump doing a good job for America. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Professor Steve Keen describes the US as a Mad Max economy – he tells Phil Dobbie the benefits will be short lived. Listen to find out why.

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Governments have been using the terms ‘fiscal conservatism’ and ‘austerity’ to bring down government spending. Often it’s meant transferring government commitments (like on education) to private or individual spending (like student loans). Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if this a sensible way to encourage growth. If we accept that more spending by government increases the availability of money for people to spend, where do you draw the line? Isn’t there a risk that the government does too much, crowding out the activities of the private sector?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Governments have been using the terms ‘fiscal conservatism’ and ‘austerity’ to bring down government spending. Often it’s meant transferring government commitments (like on education) to private or individual spending (like student loans). Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if this a sensible way to encourage growth. If we accept that more spending by government increases the availability of money for people to spend, where do you draw the line? Isn’t there a risk that the government does too much, crowding out the activities of the private sector?

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