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Economic theory is based on the blatantly false assumption that perfect competition can be achieved when everyone has access to perfect information. So, if we strive to get closer to that ideal can we assume that the economy will function better? That’s a question Phil Dobbie puts to Prof Steve Keen – and, without wishing to give away the entire answer – it would be correct if we were striving for a perfect view of the future. For that we need a time machine. Till then this basic concept of economics will forever be flawed.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

 

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Economic theory is based on the blatantly false assumption that perfect competition can be achieved when everyone has access to perfect information. So, if we strive to get closer to that ideal can we assume that the economy will function better? That’s a question Phil Dobbie puts to Prof Steve Keen – and, without wishing to give away the entire answer – it would be correct if we were striving for a perfect view of the future. For that we need a time machine. Till then this basic concept of economics will forever be flawed.

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Karl Marx got a lot right, but he was wrong about the need to a revolution. In this podcast Prof Steve Keen explains how, if Marx had followed his own theories, he would have realised that there wasn’t a need for a shift to socialism. In this free 36 minute podcast Phil Dobbie talks with Steve about the basis of Marx’s theory, from the Labour Theory of Value through to Use Value and Exchange Value. The conclusion, says Steve, is that “the increasing organic composition of capital (as Marx called it) has no implications for the rate of surplus, has no implications for the rate of profit”. So, no need for a revolution after all.

This podcast is free for everyone to enjoy, but if you want to hear more, and support the work of Steve Keen, pick a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Central banks like to control inflation using monetary theory (managing the cost of borrowing) as their way to control inflation and unemployment and avoid recessions. Whereas Keynes argues that government spending is the way to avoid recessions – pump prime the economy and “she’ll be right mate”. In this week’s podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if monetary policies ever worked – and isn’t there a danger of fiscal policy racking up too much debt?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Central banks like to control inflation using monetary theory (managing the cost of borrowing) as their way to control inflation and unemployment and avoid recessions. Whereas Keynes argues that government spending is the way to avoid recessions – pump prime the economy and “she’ll be right mate”. In this week’s podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if monetary policies ever worked – and isn’t there a danger of fiscal policy racking up too much debt?

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With Mark Zuckerberg being probed by the US government recently, and similar hearings being held in the UK, there’s been a lot of discussion lately about whether the Internet giants wield too much power. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen why we don’t treat them as monopolies, and force their break-up into smaller, competing operators. Steve doesn’t agree. He says the problem is, such a move would force prices up, rather than down. But it’s not just a question of price, surely?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

With Mark Zuckerberg being probed by the US government recently, and similar hearings being held in the UK, there’s been a lot of discussion lately about whether the Internet giants wield too much power. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen why we don’t treat them as monopolies, and force their break-up into smaller, competing operators. Steve doesn’t agree. He says the problem is, such a move would force prices up, rather than down. But it’s not just a question of price, surely?

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Land, is of course, heavily constrained. In this podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether enough value is placed on it and the influence it has on the broader economy. Housing speculation is an obvious example of how land values distort the economy. If it was left to pure market forces what are the damaging impacts on broader society and just how far should the government intervene?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Land, is of course, heavily constrained. In this podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether enough value is placed on it and the influence it has on the broader economy. Housing speculation is an obvious example of how land values distort the economy. If it was left to pure market forces what are the damaging impacts on broader society and just how far should the government intervene?

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It’s hard to support everything Vladamir Putin does – he probably was involved in the attack in Salisbury. If not, there are lots of other violations of human rights we can point to. But he does have a lot support in Russia. To understand why, you need to understand the recent past, what Russia is trying to achieve and the role of foreign powers in distracting them from their path. Today on the Debunking Economics podcast, a quick history lesson of a country that has struggled through false theories and bad advice to arrive at a point where it could finally integrate with the rest of the world – that’s if someone doesn’t blow it up first.

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