00:0000:00

William Nordaus is a recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize for Economics. He’s been recognised for his work on climate change and his quest to develop economic policy that will mitigate the worst extremes of our impact on the planet. But, as Prof Steve Keen discusses in this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast, his model is doing more harm than good, underestimating the influence of rising temperatures on GDP. For example, an increase in temperature of 10C will see global GDP fall by 25 percent – yet at such a temperature the majority of people on the planet will be wiped out. Phil Dobbie asks, can you expect any growth in GDP if you are aiming to curtail temperatures – aren’t the two forces mutually exclusive?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

William Nordaus is a recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize for Economics. He’s been recognised for his work on climate change and his quest to develop economic policy that will mitigate the worst extremes of our impact on the planet. But, as Prof Steve Keen discusses in this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast, his model is doing more harm than good, underestimating the influence of rising temperatures on GDP. For example, an increase in temperature of 10C will see global GDP fall by 25 percent – yet at such a temperature the majority of people on the planet will be wiped out. Phil Dobbie asks, can you expect any growth in GDP if you are aiming to curtail temperatures – aren’t the two forces mutually exclusive?

Premium
February 11, 2019

137. Fact-checking Freidman

Milton Friedman influenced a generation of politicians, turning them from Keynesian economics to a more free-market way of doing things. Margaret Thatcher described him an intellectual freedom fighter. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Steve Keen debunks the Friedman approach to capitalism and Phil Dobbie suggests one politician who has abandoned the approach, because he has increased tariffs, something Milton would be very opposed to.

00:0000:00

Milton Friedman influenced a generation of politicians, turning them from Keynesian economics to a more free-market way of doing things. Margaret Thatcher described him an intellectual freedom fighter. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Steve Keen debunks the Friedman approach to capitalism and Phil Dobbie suggests one politician who has abandoned the approach, because he has increased tariffs, something Milton would be very opposed to.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

00:0000:00

The world’s population is growing – and we seem to be feeling it a bit in almost every part of the world – some more than most. But could the population in some countries, like Australia for example, actually be too small … would the economy work better if there were more people in it. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if a small population hinders competition and economic efficiency? Notwithstanding the broader argument that the planet’s population cannot keep on growing at the same rate forever … or even very long.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

 

Premium

The world’s population is growing – and we seem to be feeling it a bit in almost every part of the world – some more than most. But could the population in some countries, like Australia for example, actually be too small … would the economy work better if there were more people in it. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if  a small population hinders competition and economic efficiency? Notwithstanding the broader argument that the planet’s population cannot keep on growing at the same rate forever … or even very long.

Premium

Did your mum and dad teach you to save money rather than borrow? It was better to have cash than be in debt. Yet the whole approach to money has turned on its head. We don’t save as much as we used to. In fact, we borrow to invest. It’s a generational change. In this week’s podcast Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether it’s something we should worry about. And is it any surprise we don’t save, when we’re slugged with bank fees and offered a very low interest rate? More to the point, why would we save when it’s easier to borrow?

00:0000:00

Did your mum and dad teach you to save money rather than borrow? It was better to have cash than be in debt. Yet the whole approach to money has turned on its head. We don’t save as much as we used to. In fact, we borrow to invest. It’s a generational change. In this week’s podcast Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether it’s something we should worry about. And is it any surprise we don’t save, when we’re slugged with bank fees and offered a very low interest rate? More to the point, why would we save when it’s easier to borrow?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

00:0000:00

Are we trying to apply theory developed for production-based economies, on economies driven by knowledge? It’s worse than that, Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie. The theories around production were wrong in the first place, because of flawed assumptions on marginal productivity. It just gets messier when you’re dealing with digital products and a knowledge-based economy.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Are we trying to apply theory developed for production-based economies, on economies driven by knowledge? It’s worse than that, Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie. The theories around production were wrong in the first place, because of flawed assumptions on marginal productivity. It just gets messier when you’re dealing with digital products and a knowledge-based economy.

Load more