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Just how much control does a country have over its own economy? We’ve seen wage growth stifled by international competition and the decimation of manufacturing in the West. Yet Trump and Brexit voters are pushing an agenda to take control of their economies – will they win? Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen what actually has to happen if we are to have control of our economic destiny – and our regulations - at a time of increasing international trade and the continued growth of major corporations.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

 

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February 12, 2018

88. Can sovereignty survive?

Just how much control does a country have over its own economy? We’ve seen wage growth stifled by international competition and the decimation of manufacturing in the West. Yet Trump and Brexit voters are pushing an agenda to take control of their economies – will they win? Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen what actually has to happen if we are to have control of our economic destiny – and our regulations - at a time of increasing international trade and the continued growth of major corporations.

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We often hear the argument that house prices have risen so much because there’s a lack of supply. Politicians argue that if more land was released to developers more homes would be built and the affordability issue would be fixed. Prof Steve Keen, meanwhile, has argued that it is the willingness of banks to offer massive mortgages that has pushed prices to high. In this podcast Phil Dobbie asks whether supply is still an important factor in the equation. They also discuss how geography and land-use influences prices, who meets the external costs of housing and our appetite for bigger, better houses.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

We often hear the argument that house prices have risen so much because there’s a lack of supply. Politicians argue that if more land was released to developers more homes would be built and the affordability issue would be fixed. Prof Steve Keen, meanwhile, has argued that it is the willingness of banks to offer massive mortgages that has pushed prices to high. In this podcast Phil Dobbie asks whether supply is still an important factor in the equation. They also discuss how geography and land-use influences prices, who meets the external costs of housing and our appetite for bigger, better houses.

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The Oxford Review of Economic Policy devoted its entire latest edition to rebuilding macroeconomic theory. That sounds like an acknowledgement that the theories that have guided the profession for decades might be flawed. Perhaps, you might think, it will explain why the global financial crisis happened, why growth has been so slow to pick up and why wages have stagnated. But, as Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie, the papers do little other than tweak the edges of conventional theory. It’s far from a fundamental rethink, and some of the basic errors of economics – such as the assumption that the economy will always return to equilibrium – remain unchallenged.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

The Oxford Review of Economic Policy devoted its entire latest edition to rebuilding macroeconomic theory. That sounds like an acknowledgement that the theories that have guided the profession for decades might be flawed. Perhaps, you might think, it will explain why the global financial crisis happened, why growth has been so slow to pick up and why wages have stagnated. But, as Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie, the papers do little other than tweak the edges of conventional theory. It’s far from a fundamental rethink, and some of the basic errors of economics – such as the assumption that the economy will always return to equilibrium – remain unchallenged.

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Boris Johnson has, once again, argued that money saved in fees to the EU can be used to fund better healthcare in Britain. His argument assumes the government is run like a household budget, ignoring the ability to create money. Yet we are familiar with the idea of money creation, with central banks injecting millions, or billions in the US, into the economy through bond purchases. Phil Dobbie explores the disconnect between quantitative easing and government austerity programs. He asks Prof Steve Keen, if a central bank creates money, why not simply inject it into the government’s coffers?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Boris Johnson has, once again, argued that money saved in fees to the EU can be used to fund better healthcare in Britain. His argument assumes the government is run like a household budget, ignoring the ability to create money. Yet we are familiar with the idea of money creation, with central banks injecting millions, or billions in the US, into the economy through bond purchases. Phil Dobbie explores the disconnect between quantitative easing and government austerity programs. He asks Prof Steve Keen, if a central bank creates money, why not simply inject it into the government’s coffers?

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Migration is often blamed for unemployment. The fear that there are too many migrants stealing jobs has almost certainly helped with the rise of UKIP and the election of President Trump. But is there any value in this far right rhetoric, or is conventional economy theory right for once – that migrants create demand that facilitates more jobs and adds to the economy. And are we getting so lost in the migration and employment debate that we’re missing a far bigger concern – the number of people on the planet.

 

00:0000:00

Migration is often blamed for unemployment. The fear that there are too many migrants stealing jobs has almost certainly helped with the rise of UKIP and the election of President Trump. But is there any value in this far right rhetoric, or is conventional economy theory right for once – that migrants create demand that facilitates more jobs and adds to the economy. And are we getting so lost in the migration and employment debate that we’re missing a far bigger concern – the number of people on the planet.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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