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Governments spent up big at the start of the COVID crisis, but they are being a bit more canny with their money right now. Meanwhile, central banks are seeing the need to step in, with monetary policy being used to fill the gaps where fiscal stimulus isn’t forthcoming. But are they kidding themselves? Can the economic consequences of a pandemic really be filled by a central bank dropping interest rates and buying back a large number of government bonds? In short, the answer is no. In this week’s Debunking Economics podcast Prof Steve Keen discusses the limitations of monetary policy measures with Phil Dobbie. Plus, why QE isn’t creating money, its just moving it around a bit, to those people who need it the least.

Governments spent up big at the start of the COVID crisis, but they are being a bit more canny with their money right now. Meanwhile, central banks are seeing the need to step in, with monetary policy being used to fill the gaps where fiscal stimulus isn’t forthcoming. But are they kidding themselves? Can the economic consequences of a pandemic really be filled by a central bank dropping interest rates and buying back a large number of government bonds? In short, the answer is no. In this week’s Debunking Economics podcast Prof Steve Keen discusses the limitations of monetary policy measures with Phil Dobbie. Plus, why QE isn’t creating money, its just moving it around a bit, to those people who need it the least.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

There’s a commonly held misconception that the Bank of England is creating extra money and pumping it into circulation through quantitative easing. In this week’s podcast Prof Steve Keen explains how QE amounts to nothing more than an asset swap – so no new money is created. The only way money can be created is through commercial banks issuing loans – something they are not doing much of – or governments running a deficit. Even the IMF is now suggesting that advanced economies should not be worried about public debt. Talking to Phil Dobbie, Steve explains the limited impact of QE and the need for something like the Bradbury Pound, when the government issued currency – interest free and deb free - without any involvement of private banks.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

 

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There’s a commonly held misconception that the Bank of England is creating extra money and pumping it into circulation through quantitative easing. In this week’s podcast Prof Steve Keen explains how QE amounts to nothing more than an asset swap – so no new money is created. The only way money can be created is through commercial banks issuing loans – something they are not doing much of – or governments running a deficit. Even the IMF is now suggesting that advanced economies should not be worried about public debt. Talking to Phil Dobbie, Steve explains the limited impact of QE and the need for something like the Bradbury Pound, when the government issued currency – interest free and deb free - without any involvement of private banks.

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October 6, 2020

225. A rebirth of localism

Wealth in UK is very concentrated I the southeast of England. In other countries, the structure of administration and banking has seen a more diversified economy. So what could change to make income and productivity more equable throughout the UK. In this week’s Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the devolution of Scotland, the role of local administrations, Germany’s regionalised public banking system and the role of local currencies, including the Worgl experiment in Austria during the great depression. With more people experiencing the benefits of working from home could this be the first step in a more decentralised UK economy.

Wealth in UK is very concentrated I the southeast of England. In other countries, the structure of administration and banking has seen a more diversified economy. So what could change to make income and productivity more equable throughout the UK. In this week’s Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the devolution of Scotland, the role of local administrations, Germany’s regionalised public banking system and the role of local currencies, including the Worgl experiment in Austria during the great depression. With more people experiencing the benefits of working from home could this be the first step in a more decentralised UK economy.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Politicians, the media and most economists are obsessed with government debt – now more so than ever. But, as Modern Monetary Theory has shown, there is no issue with governments perpetually running budgets in the red, providing the extra money supply resulting from it is not inflationary. This week Phil Dobbie suggests some of the debt issued in the form of bonds could be given to the public as a form of universal income, which increases when government debt is highest – when the economy is in most trouble.  So, what does Steve Keen think of this approach – and are there any downsides to the introduction of People’s Bonds?

Politicians, the media and most economists are obsessed with government debt – now more so than ever. But, as Modern Monetary Theory has shown, there is no issue with governments perpetually running budgets in the red, providing the extra money supply resulting from it is not inflationary. This week Phil Dobbie suggests some of the debt issued in the form of bonds could be given to the public as a form of universal income, which increases when government debt is highest – when the economy is in most trouble.  So, what does Steve Keen think of this approach – and are there any downsides to the introduction of People’s Bonds?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Would a job guarantee resolve the battle between inflation and unemployment? Conventional economists argue that when the labour market is tight – and there are few jobs to go around – people ask for more money and that creates inflation. When there are very few jobs – like now – inflation is much lower. The counter argument, from Modern Monetary Theorists, is that a job guarantee would reduce this flux, whilst improving the lifestyles and wellbeing of the population. This week Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether the MMT have got the logic right and, even if they have, can it be practically applied?

Would a job guarantee resolve the battle between inflation and unemployment? Conventional economists argue that when the labour market is tight – and there are few jobs to go around – people ask for more money and that creates inflation. When there are very few jobs – like now – inflation is much lower. The counter argument, from Modern Monetary Theorists, is that a job guarantee would reduce this flux, whilst improving the lifestyles and wellbeing of the population. This week Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether the MMT have got the logic right and, even if they have, can it be practically applied?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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