The world is fixated with the present. We want to earn money quickly and spend it quickly. CEOs don’t care about much beyond their stock options, politicians only work to getting re-elected, consumers want instant gratification. It’s no wonder then that we’re not prepared to make compromises for long term consequences, like climate change, because the economic system we use has no way of managing our investment in the future. Is there a better way of managing the economy, in a way that ensures we look after the planet and provides for you in your old age?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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The world is fixated with the present. We want to earn money quickly and spend it quickly. CEOs don’t care about much beyond their stock options, politicians only work to getting re-elected, consumers want instant gratification. It’s no wonder then that we’re not prepared to make compromises for long term consequences, like climate change, because the economic system we use has no way of managing our investment in the future. Is there a better way of managing the economy, in a way that ensures we look after the planet and provides for you in your old age?

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June 3, 2021

256. Relative Values

Today on the podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the value of things. Supposedly, price is a substitute for value, meaning if someone is prepared to pay more for something then they must value it more. But as they discuss, that only applies if everyone has the same amount of money. A poor household will place greater value, as a proportion of their wealth, on heating their home. A rich household will see extra use of that same resources as a discretionary item that they place little value on, particularly relative to their income. So, is the concept of value another broken element of a modern capitalist economy, and is there a way to allocate resources more effectively? We know, from the Soviet experience, that getting the state to do it creates even worse results.

Today on the podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the value of things. Supposedly, price is a substitute for value, meaning if someone is prepared to pay more for something then they must value it more. But as they discuss, that only applies if everyone has the same amount of money. A poor household will place greater value, as a proportion of their wealth, on heating their home. A rich household will see extra use of that same resources as a discretionary item that they place little value on, particularly relative to their income. So, is the concept of value another broken element of a modern capitalist economy, and is there a way to allocate resources more effectively? We know, from the Soviet experience, that getting the state to do it creates even worse results.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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US inflation is now running at 4.2% on an annual basis, and producer prices the world over have been rising as input costs for product creep up. How much of this will be passed on to the consumer as companies struggle to absorb these costs – and what impact will these higher prices have on demand? Central banks are all toeing the same line, that rising inflation is only transitory, driven by supply chain disruption, so there’s n o need for them to respond by pushing up interest rates anytime soon. But will prices bounce back? In this week’s podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie that the bigger concern, post-COVID, is going to be deflation. Listen in to find out why.

US inflation is now running at 4.2% on an annual basis, and producer prices the world over have been rising as input costs for product creep up. How much of this will be passed on to the consumer as companies struggle to absorb these costs – and what impact will these higher prices have on demand? Central banks are all toeing the same line, that rising inflation is only transitory, driven by supply chain disruption, so there’s n o need for them to respond by pushing up interest rates anytime soon. But will prices bounce back? In this week’s podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie that the bigger concern, post-COVID, is going to be deflation. Listen in to find out why.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

This pandemic has been massive amounts spent by governments, and a chunk of that government debt is being bought by central banks. But with central banks buying up government bonds, whilst maintaining low interest rates, who is really benefiting? The answer, of course, is the wealthy. This week Steve Keen explains why the current situation is widening inequality, with the central banks at the front and centre of tis change. But government policy is helping too, in the wrong direction. So, is there any way out of this. Or has COVID-19 simply amplified a trend that was already upon us?

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There seems to be an assumption by many that the crisis we have experienced will quickly bounce back. Output will resume, demand will return, everyone will be back in work and the economy will rapidly expand back to where it was before COVID. Central banks appoint to supply chain disruption in the short term that might create transit inflation, but that’s the only obstacle to the road to recovery. Except, it’s not really working that way. There are forecasts for massive growth this year, but there’s not a lot of data to support these predictions. The US jobs recovery, for example, that was expected to see one million new jobs a month, has slowed right down. And yet the IMF expects the economy to grow by 6.4 percent this year, even though more than eight million Americans who had a job before the pandemic are still looking for work. So, what’s the best approach out of the crisis? What should Treasurers and policy makers the world over be focused on. A question Phil Dobbie puts to Steve Keen in this latest Debunking Economics podcast.

There seems to be an assumption by many that the crisis we have experienced will quickly bounce back. Output will resume, demand will return, everyone will be back in work and the economy will rapidly expand back to where it was before COVID. Central banks appoint to supply chain disruption in the short term that might create transit inflation, but that’s the only obstacle to the road to recovery. Except, it’s not really working that way. There are forecasts for massive growth this year, but there’s not a lot of data to support these predictions. The US jobs recovery, for example, that was expected to see one million new jobs a month, has slowed right down. And yet the IMF expects the economy to grow by 6.4 percent this year, even though more than eight million Americans who had a job before the pandemic are still looking for work. So, what’s the best approach out of the crisis? What should Treasurers and policy makers the world over be focused on. A question Phil Dobbie puts to Steve Keen in this latest Debunking Economics podcast.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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There’s one clear difference between this recession and almost all those that have gone before. This time there was a pandemic involved, which hit demand and supply equally. So are there any similarities between this global recession and those that have gone before. Phil Dobbie puts the question to Steve Ken in this latest Debunking Economics podcast.

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