On the Why Curve podcast last week, Phil (and Roger Hearing) spoke to Daniel Gros, Director of the Centre for European Policy Studies, who argued that the gas crisis in Europe will be largely resolved by the pricing mechanism. High gas prices from Russia are making LNG imports feasible, because Europe will pay more than Asia for supplies. It won’t completely bridge the shortfall, he says, but if Europeans make a 15 percent cut in usage, then there will be no need to negotiate with Putin. This week on the Debunking Economics podcast Steve Keen argues that the pricing mechanism ignores the needs of the poor and has, for decades, favoured the rich. The fact that governments need to subsidise low-income households against rising fuel prices, whilst energy companies report record profits, demonstrates just how broken the pricing mechanism is.

Listen to the end of this podcast for some very exciting news.

Central banks are pushing up interest rates to slow down the rate of inflation. The principle is simple. Supplies are constrained and demand is high, so we’re being charged more for practically everything. If we can slow demand then the demand-supply divide will narrow. But can you do that without throwing the world into a recession in the process? The US Federal Reserve seems to think so. They put out a paper last week, by Chris Waller and Andrew Figura, called ‘What does the Beveridge curve tell us about the likelihood of a soft landing?’ Today Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the argument that a soft-landing can be secured if there are fewer jobs being offered, not a reduction in the number of people employed.

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Central banks are pushing up interest rates to slow down the rate of inflation. The principle is simple. Supplies are constrained and demand is high, so we’re being charged more for practically everything. If we can slow demand then the demand-supply divide will narrow. But can you do that without throwing the world into a recession in the process? The US Federal Reserve seems to think so. They put out a paper last week, by Chris Waller and Andrew Figura, called ‘What does the Beveridge curve tell us about the likelihood of a soft landing?’ Today Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the argument that a soft-landing can be secured if there are fewer jobs being offered, not a reduction in the number of people employed.

In the UK petrol cars emit 128g of CO2 per kilometre. In the US they drive bigger cars, for longer, so the carbon impact is that much greater. But cars, buses and motorcycles account for less than 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. Switching to electric could make a difference (unless of course the electricity is coal powered) but will it make a big enough difference, and are the objectives for Net Zero by 2050 really achievable? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen, and asks, are we lulling ourselves into a false sense of security when we think electric cars are a big part of the answer to climate change?

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In the UK petrol cars emit 128g of CO2 per kilometre. In the US they drive bigger cars, for longer, so the carbon impact is that much greater. But cars, buses and motorcycles account for less than 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. Switching to electric could make a difference (unless of course the electricity is coal powered) but will it make a big enough difference, and are the objectives for Net Zero by 2050 really achievable? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen, and asks, are we lulling ourselves into a false sense of security when we think electric cars are a big part of the answer to climate change?

As inflation grows around the world the US dollar enjoying multi-decade highs. To an extent, that’s helping mitigate the impact of inflation in the US by dampening the rising cost of imports. Most other places, though, are seeing the opposite happen. The rising dollar devalues local currencies making imports, including energy, more expensive, adding to inflation. This week Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the impacts of exchange rates on international trade and how nations could be starting to challenge the US dominance in currency markets. As Pola, a Debunking Economics Podcast listener asks, what happens as BRICs nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China) move to payments in their own currencies instead of using the US dollar? Beyond that, what if they develop their own trading currency, similar to the Bancor proposed by Keynes back in the 1940s.

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As inflation grows around the world the US dollar enjoying multi-decade highs. To an extent, that’s helping mitigate the impact of inflation in the US by dampening the rising cost of imports. Mosyt other places, though, are seeing the opposite happen. The rising dollar devalues local currencies making imports, including energy, more expensive, adding to inflation. This week Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the impacts of exchange rates on international trade and how nations could be starting to challenge the US dominance in currency markets. As Pola, a Debunking Economics Podcast listener asks, what happens as BRICs nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China) move to payments in their own currencies instead of using the US dollar? Beyond that, what if they develop their own trading currency, similar to the Bancor proposed by Keynes back in the 1940s.

When British Prime Minister Theresa May said there was no magic money tree she was wrong. There is, but you still have to look after it. What happens if you take the money off the tree too quickly, and give it to the wrong people? Is that what’s happened over the last two years? This week Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen if there’s an optimum level of expansion to the money supply (through government spending) and how do we claw back from it if we have overspent?

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Inflation is rising everywhere as supply chains hit prices in the shops and at the fuel bowsers. Central banks are responding to this the only way they know how – by pushing up interest rates. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen what’s their rationale, when higher interest rates won’t fix the supply issues? Steve suggests there will be a rapid reversal in policy when the central banks realise the real damage they are doing to the economy. ‘There will be no soft landing’, he says. ‘There never is’. But what about taxation, asks Phil. Could demand be softened by taxing the high earners?

Subscribe to hear the podcast in full.

Premium

Inflation is rising everywhere as supply chains hit prices in the shops and at the fuel bowsers. Central banks are responding to this the only way they know how – by pushing up interest rates. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen what’s their rationale, when higher interest rates won’t fix the supply issues. Steve suggests there will be a rapid reversal in policy when the central banks realise the real damage they are doing to the economy. ‘There will be no soft landing’, he says. ‘There never is’. But what about taxation, asks Phil. Could demand be softened by taxing the high earners?

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