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Governments everywhere are preoccupied with keeping their spending under control. We are conditioned into thinking about the massive levels of interest being paid on the money that our governments owe. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Professor Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie why we should quit worrying – governments can create money through their central banks. He explains the process in detail. The only concern is when money is owed in a foreign currency – again, Steve explains why. The upshot is, we should be less concerned about government debt and more worried about our trade deficit.

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The G20 is meeting in Berlin right now. With expectations of any constructive outcomes set to low, maybe there’s a better way forward. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie and Prof Steve Keen work through four ideas that could change the way the economy works – for the better. Phil suggests ideas related to climate change tariffs and a global minimum wage, whilst Steve looks at trade imbalances and a new reserve currency.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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The G20 is meeting in Berlin right now. With expectations of any constructive outcomes set to low, maybe there’s a better way forward. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie and Prof Steve Keen work through four ideas that could change the way the economy works – for the better. Phil suggests ideas related to climate change tariffs and a global minimum wage, whilst Steve looks at trade imbalances and a new reserve currency.

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In this edition Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie how tax levels are really more to do with the government controlling the level of inflation in the economy and less to do with raising revenue to pay for their own expenses. Yet, few people see it that way. Once you do, it makes sense to see tax as an instrument that manages the strength of the economy, in unison with interest rates. Look at it like that and you see that tax should be low when economic growth is slow, not higher to cover the subsequent shortfall in government revenue.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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In this edition Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie how tax levels are really more to do with the government controlling the level of inflation in the economy and less to do with raising revenue to pay for their own expenses. Yet, few people see it that way. Once you do, it makes sense to see tax as an instrument that manages the strength of the economy, in unison with interest rates. Look at it like that and you see that tax should be low when economic growth is slow, not higher to cover the subsequent shortfall in government revenue.

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The world’s Central Bankers have been meeting up in Portugal this week and seem to have colluded on the idea of raising interest rates sometime soon. It looks like the UK, Europe and Canada are in on it but, Professor Steve Keen reckons, they’ll soon be eating humble pie. Any rise in rates right now will quickly be reversed, because the bankers are ignoring the role of credit. Find out why that is so important in this free edition of the Debunking Economics Podcasts with Phil Dobbie and Steve Keen.

To hear more of these podcasts pick a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Automation, it seems, is taking its toll. For example, based on its turnover Amazon employs less than half the staff levels of the broader retail sector – and they are driving efficiency gains all the time. So, is the answer to tax robots – one of the ideas from failed French Presidency candidate Benoît Hamon. No, says Professor Steve Keen. He suggests to Phil Dobbie that the solution is a universal basic wage. But won’t that remove any incentive to work and innovate?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Automation, it seems, is taking its toll. For example, based on its turnover Amazon employs less than half the staff levels of the broader retail sector – and they are driving efficiency gains all the time. So, is the answer to tax robots – one of the ideas from failed French Presidency candidate Benoît Hamon. No, says Professor Steve Keen. He suggests to Phil Dobbie that the solution is a universal basic wage. But won’t that remove any incentive to work and innovate?

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The EU and IMF have just bailed out Greece again, so it can avoid defaulting on the interest payments for its 300 billion Euro debt. The lenders will receive their payments, whilst Greece continues to live through tough austerity measures in the vain hope of the economy recovering at some point. That seems unlikely – GDP per capita is sliding and the smarter folk are leaving the country. Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen how this particular Greek tragedy will end. Violently seems to the only logical conclusion.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

The EU and IMF have just bailed out Greece again, so it can avoid defaulting on the interest payments for its 300 billion Euro debt. The lenders will receive their payments, whilst Greece continues to live through tough austerity measures in the vain hope of the economy recovering at some point. That seems unlikely – GDP per capita is sliding and the smarter folk are leaving the country. Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen how this particular Greek tragedy will end. Violently seems to the only logical conclusion.

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