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Currencies fluctuate so much that there’s a lot of money being made betting on their movements. But isn’t that bad for an economy, creating uncertainty in prices for exports and imports? David, a Debunking Economics podcast listener, asks what is the critical factor for ensuring a stable currency. Phil Dobbie puts the question to Professor Steve Keen, but also has the answer first off – he must be learning for these podcasts!

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Currencies fluctuate so much that there’s a lot of money being made betting on their movements. But isn’t that bad for an economy, creating uncertainty in prices for exports and imports? David, a Debunking Economics podcast listener, asks what is the critical factor for ensuring a stable currency. Phil Dobbie puts the question to Professor Steve Keen, but also has the answer first off – he must be learning for these podcasts!

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There are two drivers for capitalism – the desire to consume and the desire to accumulate. Whilst the first is as strong as ever, the rising price of assets is making it harder to accumulate. So does this influence how effective capitalism is – will we work as hard if we know we can’t afford to accumulate? Or if they can afford to accumulate do they do it at the cost of consuming? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about how consumer behaviour is changing and the impact in the broader economy.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

There are two drivers for capitalism – the desire to consume and the desire to accumulate. Whilst the first is as strong as ever, the rising price of assets is making it harder to accumulate. So does this influence how effective capitalism is – will we work as hard if we know we can’t afford to accumulate? Or if they can afford to accumulate do they do it at the cost of consuming? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about how consumer behaviour is changing and the impact in the broader economy.

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Has the Bank of England lost the plot? They have lifted interest rates as though the economy was booming. Yet, just two weeks ahead the Financial Conduct Authority reported that many would struggle to pay £50 more each month on our mortgage, and real wages haven’t budged for over a decade. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen what the central bank thinks it’s doing!

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Dynamic, stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models are used by monetary policy analysts the world over. But, in this edition of the Debunking Economists podcasts, Prof. Steve Keen suggests to Phil Dobbie that the model is neither dynamic nor general that fail to recognise shocks and crises like the financial crisis or the great depression.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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October 31, 2017

70. DSGE Models Debunked

Dynamic, stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models are used by monetary policy analysts the world over. But, in this edition of the Debunking Economists podcasts, Prof. Steve Keen suggests to Phil Dobbie that the model is neither dynamic nor general that fail to recognise shocks and crises like the financial crisis or the great depression.

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It seems common sense that we should keep a handle on the amount of money in circulation. Central banks, curiously, think they do. But, as Professor Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie in this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast there are lots of ways money is created. Unfortunately, all our not recognised by conventional economists, and until we realise where money is coming from we have no hope of controlling the supply of it, or ensuring its growth is applied in an equitable way.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

 

Premium

It seems common sense that we should keep a handle on the amount of money in circulation. Central banks, curiously, think they do. But, as Professor Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie in this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast there are lots of ways money is created. Unfortunately, all our not recognised by conventional economists, and until we realise where money is coming from we have no hope of controlling the supply of it, or ensuring its growth is applied in an equitable way.

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Can centralised monetary policy work in federated states? The grand plan for the EU was to create a United States of Europe – a phrase coined by Sir Winston Churchill directly after the Second World War. In today’s podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Prof. Steve Keen about how central bank’s monetary policies might muddy Churchill’s vision. Is it possible to run a single policy across multiple countries – or federated states like in the US and Australia? Should monetary policy be centralised, even if it cuts across states and countries with their own economic policies and employment conditions?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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