Debunking Economics - the podcast

Debunking Economics - the podcast header image 1

14. What Scrooge Could Learn From Keynesian Economics

December 21st, 2016

Charles Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol to heighten awareness of the rich poor gap in Victorian London. Professor Steve Keen suggests his lavish ways described in the last few pages of the book would almost certainly end in bankruptcy. Yet, his original penny-pinching lifestyle was destructive for the economy and almost certainly reduced his profit potential. In this Christmas special edition of The Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks what the message should have been from the Ghost of Christmas Future.

00:0000:00

13. Bank Collapses, All Over Again (preview)

December 19th, 2016

Italian banks are on the verge of collapse. Former PM Matteo Renzi failed in his bid to centralise power and, supposedly, tackle the country’s dire economic circumstances. In reality, though, what could he have done? In this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast we look at the state of banks around the world and economies teetering on the edge. If we are to face another global financial crisis, driven by bank collapses, how do the circumstances compare with 2007-8? And which countries will be hit the hardest?

To listen to the full episode subscribe by choosing a plan in the right column at debunkingeconomics.com

00:0000:00

13. Bank Collapses, All Over Again.

December 19th, 2016

Italian banks are on the verge of collapse. Former PM Matteo Renzi failed in his bid to centralise power and, supposedly, tackle the country’s dire economic circumstances. In reality, though, what could he have done? In this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast we look at the state of banks around the world and economies teetering on the edge. If we are to face another global financial crisis, driven by bank collapses, how do the circumstances compare with 2007-8? And which countries will be hit the hardest?

12. Is Productivity Really That Important? (preview)

December 8th, 2016

Obviously we want to ensure that we are doing the most with the resources we have, but are we placing too much importance on productivity as a key measure of how well an economy is performing. In this episode of The Debunking Economics podcast Prof. Steve Keen suggests that the figure is misleading, and hides the growing inequality in society. There are better measures, he believes.

To listen to the full episode subscribe by choosing a plan in the right column at debunkingeconomics.com

00:0000:00

12. Is Productivity Really That Important?

December 8th, 2016

Obviously we want to ensure that we are doing the most with the resources we have, but are we placing too much importance on productivity as a key measure of how well an economy is performing. In this episode of The Debunking Economics podcast Prof. Steve Keen suggests that the figure is misleading, and hides the growing inequality in society. There are better measures, he believes.

11. Why Debt is Like Sex With Accountants

December 6th, 2016

In this FREE episode of The Debunking Economics podcast Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie why economists have got their theories wrong because they have misunderstood the role of double entry book-keeping. That means, argues Steve, this episode will be particularly exciting for accountants – perhaps the most fun they’ll ever have. And we discover why government debt is generally a good thing, but too much private debt can be destructive.

00:0000:00

10. National debt and private debt – how one can help the other (preview)

November 30th, 2016

The media, governments and mainstream economists are obsessed with concerns over government debt. Yet in the UK and most other developed nations private debt is a bigger issue. Why is it that we expect our governments to operate without borrowing, whilst many of us are mortgaged to the hilt? In this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast we examine the two types of debt and the consequences of each rising to high levels. Also, why does one tend to rise while the other falls? What can we learn from the 1920s? And why is the trade balance a related, but more important, issue.

To listen to the full episode subscribe by choosing a plan in the right column at debunkingeconomics.com

00:0000:00

10. National debt and private debt – how one can help the other

November 30th, 2016

The media, governments and mainstream economists are obsessed with concerns over government debt. Yet in the UK and most other developed nations private debt is a bigger issue. Why is it that we expect our governments to operate without borrowing, whilst many of us are mortgaged to the hilt? In this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast we examine the two types of debt and the consequences of each rising to high levels. Also, why does one tend to rise while the other falls? What can we learn from the 1920s? And why is the trade balance a related, but more important, issue.

9. How Much is Free Trade Costing Us? (preview)

November 26th, 2016

Back in 1817, in his catchy titled book ‘On the principle of political economy and taxation’, David Ricardo gave the mathematical argument for free trade based on comparative advantage. The argument goes that we’d all be better off if countries focused on what they’re best at producing, even if someone else might do a better. In this episode Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie why the theory doesn’t hold – we only need to look at the industrialisation of Japan as an example.

To listen to the full episode subscribe by choosing a plan in the right column at debunkingeconomics.com

00:0000:00

9. How Much is Free Trade Costing Us?

November 26th, 2016

Back in 1817, in his catchy titled book ‘On the principle of political economy and taxation’, David Ricardo gave the mathematical argument for free trade based on comparative advantage. The argument goes that we’d all be better off if countries focused on what they’re best at producing, even if someone else might do a better. In this episode Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie why the theory doesn’t hold – we only need to look at the industrialisation of Japan as an example.