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Which comes first, demand or supply? If you want to grow an economy should you offer money or tax cuts to increase demand, or should you fund jobs to create supply and wages. Donald Trump, like many politicians before him, believes cutting taxes will make more spending power available to create more jobs. Is he right, when many classical economists have argued the opposite – that job creation is the key to spending power. It’s the timeless chicken and egg question except, in this case, Prof Steve Keen believes there’s a very clear answer.

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In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast we test Donald Trump’s accusations that China, Japan and Germany are manipulating their currencies – something he hates, of course, because it makes it harder for him to achieve his aim, of returning the US to a positive balance of trade. It’s a big undertaking. Is he right that these countries have an unfair advantage over the US and, if so, will a tariff barrier really rectify the problem, or just start a trade war?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast we test Donald Trump’s accusations that China, Japan and Germany are manipulating their currencies – something he hates, of course, because it makes it harder for him to achieve his aim, of returning the US to a positive balance of trade. It’s a big undertaking. Is he right that these countries have an unfair advantage over the US and, if so, will a tariff barrier really rectify the problem, or just start a trade war?

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Donald Trump has talked about a 20 percent tax on exports from Mexico to help pay for the wall, but has also spoken about a broader tax on all imports. Many fear it’s a form of protectionism that could spark a trade war, but perhaps they are misunderstanding the intent of Trump’s plan. It’s possible he is following the thinking of Oxford professor Michael Devereux who argues that corporate tax should be applied where consumption happens, rather than where profit is generated. That would mean, irrespective of where goods are made, if they are consumed in America, companies would be taxed. Companies that tried to manufacture elsewhere and sell to the US could end up being taxed in both countries, so it heightens the incentive to produce locally.

In this free edition of The Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether Trump has the right idea on this one. We also look at the fundamental purpose of taxation. The idea that it is fundamentally there to create revenue for the government is the wrong way of thinking about it, says Steve.

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The Bank of England, like many central banks, has used Quantitative Easing as a tool to try and engender growth in the economy. It’s a tool they had to resort to when sustained low interest rates failed to achieve the desired outcome. In this podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about how QE is, why it’s failing and how to should be redesigned. Hopefully the Bank of England will listen, along with the Treasury. In fact, the UK’s Treasury Committee is running an inquiry into the Effectiveness and Impact of post-2008 UK Monetary Policy and we discuss Steve’s submission in the podcast.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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The Bank of England, like many central banks, has used Quantitative Easing as a tool to try and engender growth in the economy. It’s a tool they had to resort to when sustained low interest rates failed to achieve the desired outcome. In this podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about how QE is, why it’s failing and how to should be redesigned. Hopefully the Bank of England will listen, along with the Treasury. In fact, the UK’s Treasury Committee is running an inquiry into the Effectiveness and Impact of post-2008 UK Monetary Policy and we discuss Steve’s submission in the podcast.

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You’ve probably seen them – emails telling you now is the time to buy gold. When currencies collapse, gold is the safe-haven that speculators turn to. In this episode, Phil Dobbie explores the idea of stocking up with gold, with Professor Steve Keen. Is gold safer than keeping money in a bank? Is it premature to buy gold right now? What are the signs that an economic downturn and banking crisis is occurring? But buying gold isn’t the answer – reducing your level of debt is.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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You’ve probably seen them – emails telling you now is the time to buy gold. When currencies collapse, gold is the safe-haven that speculators turn to. In this episode, Phil Dobbie explores the idea of stocking up with gold, with Professor Steve Keen. Is gold safer than keeping money in a bank? Is it premature to buy gold right now? What are the signs that an economic downturn and banking crisis is occurring? But buying gold isn’t the answer – reducing your level of debt is.

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It’s very easy to look at the big salaries in the city and compare it to the average wage and assume bankers are taking us for a ride. But, for time immemorial we have needed money as a more effective means of trade than bartering. Who wants a chicken egg in exchange for today’s paper? So, banks emerged as the intermediary that enables trade. But, as Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie, banks don’t just act as an intermediary, they also create money, and focus on encouraging us all to build up debt. So, can we regulate banks to ensure they work in ways which are best for the community? Part of the answer, says Steve, is to see them focus more on equity than loans.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

Premium

It’s very easy to look at the big salaries in the city and compare it to the average wage and assume bankers are taking us for a ride. But, for time immemorial we have needed money as a more effective means of trade than bartering. Who wants a chicken egg in exchange for today’s paper? So, banks emerged as the intermediary that enables trade. But, as Prof Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie, banks don’t just act as an intermediary, they also create money, and focus on encouraging us all to build up debt. So, can we regulate banks to ensure they work in ways which are best for the community? Part of the answer, says Steve, is to see them focus more on equity than loans.

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