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Can centralised monetary policy work in federated states? The grand plan for the EU was to create a United States of Europe – a phrase coined by Sir Winston Churchill directly after the Second World War. In today’s podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Prof. Steve Keen about how central bank’s monetary policies might muddy Churchill’s vision. Is it possible to run a single policy across multiple countries – or federated states like in the US and Australia? Should monetary policy be centralised, even if it cuts across states and countries with their own economic policies and employment conditions?

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At their party conference last week the Tories were united on one thing – a Corbyn government would lead to Venezuelan style socialism. Free market thinking is the right and proper way to prosper. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast we look at how socialism has become a swear word and there’s no acknowledgement of the middle ground from either side of politics. As Phil Dobbie discusses with Professor Steve Keen, both extremes fail. But where is the middle ground of politics?

To hear more of these podcasts subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (http://debunking.podbean.com/). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Earlier this year President Trump was complaining that China was guilty of currency manipulation. Cheap prices were giving the Chinese a competitive advantage, evidenced by a trade balance between the two nations that, last year, was $347 billion in favour of China. So what’s the best way of dealing with the strength of the Chinese economy. Prof Steve Keen suggests that the President was right at the onset – reindustrialise and wait for China’s main advantage, cheap labour, to diminish in importance. Sadly, his plans have gone by the wayside, so they’re stuck with Chinese imports for a long while yet. But could other nations follow China’s lead?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Earlier this year President Trump was complaining that China was guilty of currency manipulation. Cheap prices were giving the Chinese a competitive advantage, evidenced by a trade balance between the two nations that, last year, was $347 billion in favour of China. So what’s the best way of dealing with the strength of the Chinese economy. Prof Steve Keen suggests that the President was right at the onset – reindustrialise and wait for China’s main advantage, cheap labour, to diminish in importance. Sadly, his plans have gone by the wayside, so they’re stuck with Chinese imports for a long while yet. But could other nations follow China’s lead?

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UK inflation is now at 2.9% - the highest it’s been in five years – and well above the 2% target that the Bank of England has set for itself. It means we can expect an interest rate rise in the very near future. In the US the Federal Reserve is also looking to raise interest rates even though inflation has subsided lately. In this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if inflation is on the way back, how should central banks react and can we still have economic growth without it.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

UK inflation is now at 2.9% - the highest it’s been in five years – and well above the 2% target that the Bank of England has set for itself. It means we can expect an interest rate rise in the very near future. In the US the Federal Reserve is also looking to raise interest rates even though inflation has subsided lately. In this edition of The Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if inflation is on the way back, how should central banks react and can we still have economic growth without it.

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The US Federal Reserve is getting rid of it, the European Central Bank has talked about it and could go next. Quantitative Easing, it seems, is falling out of favour. But was it doing any good any way? In this podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether QE helps the broader economy or just the financial elites? Vitor Constancio, the Vice President of the European Central Bank has said that QE reduces inequality because it creates jobs for low income workers. Is he right?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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The US Federal Reserve is getting rid of it, the European Central Bank has talked about it and could go next. Quantitative Easing, it seems, is falling out of favour. But was it doing any good any way? In this podcast Phil Dobbie asks Professor Steve Keen whether QE helps the broader economy or just the financial elites? Vitor Constancio, the Vice President of the European Central Bank has said that QE reduces inequality because it creates jobs for low income workers. Is he right?

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It’s 10 years since the start of the global financial crisis, when the UK saw a run on the Northern Rock Building Society. A year letter the contagion spread, with banks falling like flies on both sides of the Atlantic. So what went wrong and are we repeating the mistakes. Phil Dobbie talks to Professor Steve Keen, one of a handful of people who predicted the crisis the first-time round. In this podcast he suggests that, this time, we might not see banks collapsing, but the economic impact will be just as spectacular. 

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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September 15, 2017

63. The Crisis Ten Years On

It’s 10 years since the start of the global financial crisis, when the UK saw a run on the Northern Rock Building Society. A year letter the contagion spread, with banks falling like flies on both sides of the Atlantic. So what went wrong and are we repeating the mistakes. Phil Dobbie talks to Professor Steve Keen, one of a handful of people who predicted the crisis the first-time round. In this podcast he suggests that, this time, we might not see banks collapsing, but the economic impact will be just as spectacular. 

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