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Figures out in the US last week showed the unemployment rate had dropped to just 4.5 percent, a long way from the 10% rate back in 2009. Yet Donald Trump won an election, in part, because he was there to protect jobs for Americans. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen What’s the problem when so many seem to be gainfully employed? The answer, it seems, is that you can do anything you want with statistics. Take a look at this graph to see his point: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/graph/?g=djl1

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Figures out in the US last week showed the unemployment rate had dropped to just 4.5 percent, a long way from the 10% rate back in 2009. Yet Donald Trump won an election, in part, because he was there to protect jobs for Americans. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen What’s the problem when so many seem to be gainfully employed? The answer, it seems, is that you can do anything you want with statistics. Take a look at this graph to see his point: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/graph/?g=djl1

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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Mark Perry, Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Michigan, believes that raising the minimum wage will push costs up so high companies won’t be able to afford them. He wrote, “a $15 minimum wage maximizes the probability that an unskilled worker will be unemployed at $0.00 an hour instead of being gainfully employed”. So, is that the case? Prof Steve Keen argues he is making the mistake of many economists, applying a micro-economic argument to macro-economics. Find out how the Michigan professor got it so wrong.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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Mark Perry, Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Michigan, believes that raising the minimum wage will push costs up so high companies won’t be able to afford them. He wrote in his blog, “a $15 minimum wage maximizes the probability that an unskilled worker will be unemployed at $0.00 an hour instead of being gainfully employed”. So, is that the case? Prof DSteve Keen argues he is making the mistake of many economists, applying a micro-economic argument to macro-economics. Find out how the Michigan professor got it so wrong.

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Latest UK employment statistics show that more than half of the jobs added in the last year went to the self-employed. Part of this will be entrepreneurs forging their own path, but many will be people forced to establish themselves as sole traders and work for companies on a more casual basis. In this podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the benefits and problems with the gig economy. On issue, of course, is the amount of money people make. Could the gig economy force a universal basic income?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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Latest UK employment statistics show that more than half of the jobs added in the last year went to the self-employed. Part of this will be entrepreneurs forging their own path, but many will be people forced to establish themselves as sole traders and work for companies on a more casual basis. In this podcast Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the benefits and problems with the gig economy. On issue, of course, is the amount of money people make. Could the gig economy force a universal basic income?

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It seems there’s a relentless desire to try and apply free market principles to public goods, like health, education, defence and research. Even though they usually operate in a monopolistic environment, bureaucrats are always finding ways to apply measures – fiscal or performance based – that distort the way these goods operate. So, in this podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if there are occasions when marketized principles can be applied to public goods, in the interests of improving performance.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app).

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It seems there’s a relentless desire to try and apply free market principles to public goods, like health, education, defence and research. Even though they usually operate in a monopolistic environment, bureaucrats are always finding ways to apply measures – fiscal or performance based – that distort the way these goods operate. So, in this podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if there are occasions when marketized principles can be applied to public goods, in the interests of improving performance

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Karl Marx argued that the bourgeoisie got rich by creaming their wealth off the proletariat who did all the work. But in this podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie that it’s not the capitlists who are getting rich from the workers – it’s the often ignored “third class” of citizen, who make up a large part of the wealthiest people on the planet. And they’ve been increasing their influence over recently decades.

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Karl Marx argued that the bourgeoisie got rich by creaming their wealth off the proletariat who did all the work. But in this podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie that it’s not the capitlists who are getting rich from the workers – it’s the often ignored “third class” of citizen, who make up a large part of the wealthiest people on the planet. And they’ve been increasing their influence over recently decades.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or you can become a Steve Keen patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen - if you provide support of $10 or more per month you will get access to all these podcasts included.

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