Economics works so well because we al have perfect information about everything, all the time. Right? We choose products at the best price because we know all about all products and their prices, so we can make the best choice. That means we can all pursue our own self-interests to provide the most efficient outcome for any situation. Huh? This week Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the myth of perfect information and the equally as convoluted theories around asymmetric information. But are we getting closer to this supposed information utopia, thanks to the internet? Or is it the supplier who is gathering perfect information, about us?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium
November 20, 2021

249. Too much information

Economics works so well because we al have perfect information about everything, all  the time. Right? We choose products at the best price because we know all about all products and their prices, so we can make the best choice. That means we can all pursue our own self-interests to provide the most efficient outcome for any situation. This week Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the myth of perfect information and the equally as convoluted theories around asymmetric information. But are we getting closer to this supposed information utopia, thanks to the internet? Or is it the supplier who is gathering perfect information, about us?

If capitalism is driving everyone to make a profit – and we all save a bit of that profit and therefore accumulate more wealth, does that mean everyone can be better off, if we all run profitable businesses? Does that mean Boris Johnson’s idea of levelling up is a good one? Or is there a constraint on how much wealth there is. Today on the Debunking Economics podcast Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie the difference between stocks and flows. Profits are flows, whereas accumulated wealth is a stock. He shows how everyone cold theoretically create a profit, but if you increase your wealth you are doing so at the expense of someone else. Once again, it’s easier to explain if you understand double entry bookkeeping.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

If capitalism is driving everyone to make a profit – and we all save a bit of that profit and therefore accumulate more wealth, does that mean everyone can be better off, if we all run profitable businesses? Does that mean Boris Johnson’s idea of levelling up is a good one? Or is there a constraint on how much wealth there is. Today on the Debunking Economics podcast Steve Keen explains to Phil Dobbie the difference between stocks and flows. Profits are flows, whereas accumulated wealth is a stock. He shows how everyone cold theoretically create a profit, but if you increase your wealth you are doing so at the expense of someone else. Once again, it’s easier to explain if you understand double entry bookkeeping.

During his Tory Party conference speech, Boris Johnson said that he remembers something about Wilfredo Pareto, in the “cobwedded attic of (his) memories”. In his mind, Pareto was all about  levelling up – that you can improve the lot of some of society without anyone else losing out. But Pareto is most famous for the 80:20 rule – at the time he observed that 80 percent of land in Italy was owned by 20 percent of the population. It’d be worse than that today. For example, in England half of all land is owned by less than one percent of the population. So, can you really expect to be able to improve the wealth of everyone? If the poor suddenly get rich, won’t they demand the swathes of land that is the domain of the uber-wealthy? Plus, doesn’t climate change place a ceiling on growth that puts paid to Jonson’s ambitions. Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen, and asks whether levelling up is a vain hope, and whether Pareto ever argued the case in the first place.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

During his Tory Party conference speech, Boris Johnson said that he remembers something about Wilfredo Pareto, in the “cobwedded attic of (his) memories”. In his mind, Pareto was all about  levelling up – that you can improve the lot of some of society without anyone else losing out. But Pareto is most famous for the 80:20 rule – at the time he observed that 80 percent of land in Italy was owned by 20 percent of the population. It’d be worse than that today. For example, in England half of all land is owned by less than one percent of the population. So, can you really expect to be able to improve the wealth of everyone? If the poor suddenly get rich, won’t they demand the swathes of land that is the domain of the uber-wealthy? Plus, doesn’t climate change place a ceiling on growth that puts paid to Jonson’s ambitions. Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen, and asks whether levelling up is a vain hope, and whether Pareto ever argued the case in the first place.

Premium
October 26, 2021

276. Currency wars

Donald Trump believed that China was manipulating its currency to get an unfair advantage against the US. This week Professor Steve Keen explains why manipulating currencies isn’t that easy – and the US will always be at a disadvantage when it comes to competing for international trade.  He talks with Phil Dobbie about why countries moved to floating exchange rates, and how the system would have worked better if people had listened to Keynes. Meanwhile, it’s helped create an industry that transacts almost $2.5 quadrillion each year!

October 26, 2021

276. Currency Wars (preview)

Donald Trump believed that China was manipulating its currency to get an unfair advantage against the US. This week Professor Steve Keen explains why manipulating currencies isn’t that easy – and the US will always be at a disadvantage when it comes to competing for international trade.  He talks with Phil Dobbie about why countries moved to floating exchange rates, and how the system would have worked better if people had listened to Keynes. Meanwhile, it’s helped create an industry that transacts almost $2.5 quadrillion each year!

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium
October 18, 2021

275. The energy crunch

The world’s leaders are getting together in the UK at the end of this month to discuss how to tackle climate change. Meanwhile, fuel prices are rising higher and higher, and increasing talk of inflation. Prices are rising because, quite simply, demand is rising but supply is still constrained. Gas supplies in Europe are dependent on Russia and renewable energy has been held back by low winds and other weather-related influences. Now, to meet demand, countries are stepping up their use of fossil fuels. Energy supplies “at any costs” has been the approach in China. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether we’ll ever reach renewable targets whilst the energy industry is in private hands. In the UK how much of the problem we now face is the result of Thatcher-era philosophies that believed competition would yield greater amounts of lower priced energy?

The world’s leaders are getting together in the UK at the end of this month to discuss how to tackle climate change. Meanwhile, fuel prices are rising higher and higher, and increasing talk of inflation. Prices are rising because, quite simply, demand is rising but supply is still constrained. Gas supplies in Europe are dependent on Russia and renewable energy has been held back by low winds and other weather-related influences. Now, to meet demand, countries are stepping up their use of fossil fuels. Energy supplies “at any costs” has been the approach in China. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether we’ll ever reach renewable targets whilst the energy industry is in private hands. In the UK how much of the problem we now face is the result of Thatcher-era philosophies that believed competition would yield greater amounts of lower priced energy?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Load more

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App