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July 15, 2019

158. Good debt, bad debt

Is debt good or bad? Or does it depend on the type of debt? One of our listeners, Roy Langston, wrote in to ask why Steve Keen is in favour of bank created debt. Shouldn’t investment be funded by other people’s savings?  If debt is funded by money created by banks, pursuing income from the interest, doesn’t it create too much debt money, which Steve is calling to resolve through a debt jubilee? An interesting question that Phil Dobbie puts to Steve, as well as discussing when debt can be a good thing, even if the money was created by banks.

Is debt good or bad? Or does it depend on the type of debt? One of our listeners, Roy Langston, wrote in to ask why Steve Keen is in favour of bank created debt. Shouldn’t investment be funded by other people’s savings?  If debt is funded by money created by banks, pursuing income from the interest, doesn’t it create too much debt money, which Steve is calling to resolve through a debt jubilee? An interesting question that Phil Dobbie puts to Steve, as well as discussing when debt can be a good thing, even if the money was created by banks.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Just after WW2 the UK government’s spending on pensions in the UK amounted to about 2 percent of GDP – these days its nearer 8 percent. Despite this, over the years we’ve seen an increasing number of people funding their retirement through private schemes, rather than relying on state pensions. And yet, a recent YouGov poll shows that one third of the population reckon they won’t have enough to live off when they retire. In this edition of the Debunking Economics Podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen how we got into this situation – spending more and more money but failing to meet the needs of people in their old age. Is there a better way of ensuring that we can survive gracefully in our latter years?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Just after WW2 the UK government’s spending on pensions in the UK amounted to about 2 percent of GDP – these days its nearer 8 percent. Despite this, over the years we’ve seen an increasing number of people funding their retirement through private schemes, rather than relying on state pensions. And yet, a recent YouGov poll shows that one third of the population reckon they won’t have enough to live off when they retire. In this edition of the Debunking Economics Podcast Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen how we got into this situation – spending more and more money but failing to meet the needs of people in their old age. Is there a better way of ensuring that we can survive gracefully in our latter years?

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As the UK Labour party grapples with ways to reduce the advantage of inherited wealth, so we all start life on an equal footing, Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the idea of a land tax. Could it replace income tax as the major form of taxation? On the surface, it seems like it could counter a lot of economic problems, such as income diversity, housing affordability and the geographic concentration of capital. Unlike income tax, it’s also impossible to dodge. So what’s the downside?

As the UK Labour party grapples with ways to reduce the advantage of inherited wealth, so we all start life on an equal footing, Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the idea of a land tax. Could it replace income tax as the major form of taxation? On the surface, it seems like it could counter a lot of economic problems, such as income diversity, housing affordability and the geographic concentration of capital. Unlike income tax, it’s also impossible to dodge. So what’s the downside?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Most press coverage of Facebook’s announcement of a new global currency by 2020 has been negative. Facebook already knows so much about us, can we trust them with our money? But they seem to have missed the intent of the Libra Foundation, which is a not-for-profit, of which Facebook is one of many equal partners, trying to extend access to banking to the 1 billion or so who are currently outside the system. Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the benefits of the Libra project, whilst considering the impact it could have on local economies.

Most press coverage of Facebook’s announcement of a new global currency by 2020 has been negative. Facebook already knows so much about us, can we trust them with our money? But they seem to have missed the intent of the Libra Foundation, which is a not-for-profit, of which Facebook is one of many equal partners, trying to extend access to banking to the 1 billion or so who are currently outside the system. Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the benefits of the Libra project, whilst considering the impact it could have on local economies.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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The EU is struggling right now. The Bundesbank has downgraded its 21019 GDP forecast from 1.6% down to 0.6%. The Italian government is being threatened for breaching the EU’s spending rules. Yellow vests protestors have been out on the streets of Paris for 31 weeks now, fighting against inequality. This week the European Central Bank meets to determine how to boost the bloc’s economic growth. But, Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen, isn’t it time for a fundamental rethink of how the EU is structured and operates? With reforms to the EU, would Brexit have been necessary?

The EU is struggling right now. The Bundesbank has downgraded its 21019 GDP forecast from 1.6% down to 0.6%. The Italian government is being threatened for breaching the EU’s spending rules. Yellow vests protestors have been out on the streets of Paris for 31 weeks now, fighting against inequality. This week the European Central Bank meets to determine how to boost the bloc’s economic growth. But, Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen, isn’t it time for a fundamental rethink of how the EU is structured and operates? With reforms to the EU, would Brexit have been necessary?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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