Boris Johnson has talked frequently about levelling up the UK economy – bringing the wealth of the more deprived areas so they are closer to the wealth of the more affluent areas, without the affluent folks having to pay for it. This week, Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether that’s possible, or do you have to level down – take some of the wealth from the high earners to distribute to the more deprived regions? They discuss growth poles, carrot and stick measures and the importance of minimum wage and local council funding. The answer for Boris is in this podcast, let’s hope Dominic gives it a listen.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Boris Johnson has talked frequently about levelling up the UK economy – bringing the wealth of the more deprived areas so they are closer to the wealth of the more affluent areas, without the affluent folks having to pay for it. This week, Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether that’s possible, or do you have to level down – take some of the wealth from the high earners to distribute to the more deprived regions? They discuss growth poles, carrot and stick measures and the importance of minimum wage and local council funding. The answer for Boris is in this podcast, let’s hope Dominic gives it a listen.

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Inevitably, as governments spend more and more money to help their economies navigate through the COVID-19 crisis, the questions inevitably being asked is, how will all this be paid for? The assumption is, either governments will have to cut back on spending, or taxes will have to be increased. Few economists or politicians suggest that the debt is never repaid. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobie talks with Prof Steve Keen about how central banks, like the Bank of England, are creating money to cover this extra spending. Isn’t there a danger that if it gets out of hand we’ll end up like Zimbabwe, or Germany after the first world war? Once a central bank has created money to cover government debt, can it ever really be wound back?

Inevitably, as governments spend more and more money to help their economies navigate through the COVID-19 crisis, the questions inevitably being asked is, how will all this be paid for? The assumption is, either governments will have to cut back on spending, or taxes will have to be increased. Few economists or politicians suggest that the debt is never repaid. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobie talks with Prof Steve Keen about how central banks, like the Bank of England, are creating money to cover this extra spending. Isn’t there a danger that if it gets out of hand we’ll end up like Zimbabwe, or Germany after the first world war? Once a central bank has created money to cover government debt, can it ever really be wound back?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Donald Trump is pushing ahead with his protectionist agenda, and possibly with good reason. There were over 17 million manufacturing jobs in the US in 2000, in the 10 years that followed, China joined the WTO and the US lost about a third of those jobs.  In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether protectionism is valid in this day and age. What of the conventional philosophy that trying to do everything locally avoids economies of scale and pushes prices up for everyone? Steve’s argument, you need a complex economy to produce efficiency and innovation. It’s the lack of protectionism that has stymied growth in many economies. But there are exceptions, especially for an Elon Musk fan boy like Steve!

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Furloughed workers, self-employed grant schemes, increased unemployment benefits, low interest loans, quantitative easing – governments and central banks are pulling out all the stops to try and offset the economic consequences of COVID-19. So who is doing it well? Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen to evaluate some of the programs implemented around the world – which ones are effective, which help the finance sector but do little for the broader population, and is there enough of it given the size of the impact? Governments are now trying to pull back on stimulus programs, even though infections continue and unemployment is in danger of rising still higher? Will we have learnt anything at the end of this experience about how the economy really works?

Furloughed workers, self-employed grant schemes, increased unemployment benefits, low interest loans, quantitative easing – governments and central banks are pulling out all the stops to try and offset the economic consequences of COVID-19. So who is doing it well? Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen to evaluate some of the programs implemented around the world – which ones are effective, which help the finance sector but do little for the broader population, and is there enough of it given the size of the impact? Governments are now trying to pull back on stimulus programs, even though infections continue and unemployment is in danger of rising still higher? Will we have learnt anything at the end of this experience about how the economy really works?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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June 10, 2020

208. Share Crazy

The world is facing the greatest economic downturn of our time. In the US at least 15 million more people are unemployed than just a few months ago. There are fears of a second wave and, even if it is contained and a cure is found, the chief scientist at the World Health Organisation is now saying it could take up to five years to get the virus under control. Meanwhile, as governments inject trillions of dollars of stimulus into the economy, share prices are reaching all-time highs. How can that be? How can the markets behave as though we were in the midst of the best of times? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about what’s really driving share prices ever upwards.

The world is facing the greatest economic downturn of our time. In the US at least 15 million more people are unemployed than just a few months ago. There are fears of a second wave and, even if it is contained and a cure is found, the chief scientist at the World Health Organisation is now saying it could take up to five years to get the virus under control. Meanwhile, as governments inject trillions of dollars of stimulus into the economy, share prices are reaching all-time highs. How can that be? How can the markets behave as though we were in the midst of the best of times? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about what’s really driving share prices ever upwards.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

The US might not be in a great place right now, with the riots, a narcissistic president and the COVID-19 virus taking a long time to slow down, yet, for generations it has been the country the world looks to for opportunity and innovation.  Look at almost all the world’s newest big companies – Microsoft, Apple, Google, Twitter, Tesla – and they all hail from America. It claims a huge proportion of the world’s inventions and innovations. On that basis, shouldn’t we still be looking up to America? What is it they are doing that the rest of us are not?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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