Larry Randall Wray has suggested Modern Monetary Theory should be applied to create a Green New Deal. This week and next, Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the idea of creating government money to tackle the climate emergency. Would it work? Is there a danger that public sector spending will crowd out private investment in innovative approaches to renewable energy? And what can we learn from the original New Deal, from Roosevelt just after the Great Depression?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Larry Randall Wray has suggested Modern Monetary Theory should be applied to create a Green New Deal. This week and next, Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the idea of creating government money to tackle the climate emergency. Would it work? Is there a danger that public sector spending will crowd out private investment in innovative approaches to renewable energy? And what can we learn from the original New Deal, from Roosevelt just after the Great Depression?

There’s a glimmer of hope that the US China trade war will ease a little. In other words, it won’t get worse. But even so, the tariffs and other conditions are being felt in both countries. Steve Keen, who is not a fan of global trade, admits this one is having a destructive effect on the global economy. So how will it end? Could Trump achieve his aim of drawing manufacturing back to the United States? If he does, how long will it take? And what happens in the meantime?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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There’s a glimmer of hope that the US China trade war will ease a little. In other words, it won’t get worse. But even so, the tariffs and other conditions are being felt in both countries. Steve Keen, who is not a fan of global trade, admits this one is having a destructive effect on the global economy. So how will it end? Could Trump achieve his aim of drawing manufacturing back to the United States? If he does, how long will it take? And what happens in the meantime?

At the Labour party conference recently, UK Shadow Chancellor outlined the policy aim of reducing the working week to 32 hours, with no loss in pay. It’s been lambasted by many, who see it as a way of reducing productivity and costing jobs as businesses fail against overseas competitors with a lower cost base. In this week’s podcast, Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie that the protagonists have got it wrong. The reason productivity has slowed is because companies are becoming too reliant on low cost labour. A rise in labour costs will encourage more investment in technology, which is what will increase productivity. It’s impossible to increase the productivity of low skilled labour because humans can’t improve their energy output without machines to help them.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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At the Labour party conference recently, UK Shadow Chancellor outlined the policy aim of reducing the working week to 32 hours, with no loss in pay. It’s been lambasted by many, who see it as a way of reducing productivity and costing jobs as businesses fail against overseas competitors with a lower cost base. In this week’s podcast, Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie that the protagonists have got it wrong. The reason productivity has slowed is because companies are becoming too reliant on low cost labour. A rise in labour costs will encourage more investment in technology, which is what will increase productivity. It’s impossible to increase the productivity of low skilled labour because humans can’t improve their energy output without machines to help them.

Modern monetary theory tells us that we shouldn’t worry about government debt – that governments can create money to spend to projects that will create full employment. Even if that is the case, what happens when the money you need isn’t in your currency? It’s a question Phil Dobbie puts to Prof Steve Keen in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast. You can’t create foreign currency, but you might well need it to pay for your government expenditure. So how does Modern monetary theory work in practice, for small countries that need foreign currencies to buy the imports they need to grow their economy?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Modern monetary theory tells us that we shouldn’t worry about government debt – that governments can create money to spend to projects that will create full employment. Even if that is the case, what happens when the money you need isn’t in your currency? It’s a question Phil Dobbie puts to Prof Steve Keen in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast. You can’t create foreign currency, but you might well need it to pay for your government expenditure. So how does Modern monetary theory work in practice, for small countries that need foreign currencies to buy the imports they need to grow their economy?

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September 23, 2019

168. The insignificance of gold

There were times when men would leave their families to head for the hills and pan for gold. There were times when the value of currencies was tied to gold. These days, there aren’t so many discoveries and money is no long tied to the gold standard. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen what is the use of gold today, and why do investors rush to it in times of uncertainty. And if it has nothing to do with monetary policy, why is most gold still locked up in the vaults of central banks?

There were times when men would leave their families to head for the hills and pan for gold. There were times when the value of currencies was tied to gold. These days, there aren’t so many discoveries and money is no long tied to the gold standard. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen what is the use of gold today, and why do investors rush to it in times of uncertainty. And if it has nothing to do with monetary policy, why is most gold still locked up in the vaults of central banks?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

 

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