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Central banks around the world are at different stages of how they supposedly deal with the COVId-19 crisis. Most are implementing some form of QE, but many are now reducing their purchases, and some are even lifting interest rates. How can they all have a different monetary approach to dealing with the same crisis? And can any claim to have been operating independently, buying up the increasing amount of debt issued by their respective governments? With the big four central banks (the BoE, the ECB, the Fed and the BoJ) having amassed $24.5 trillion in government bonds, does anybody really expect they will ever get their balance sheets back down to zero? If not, have they really embarked on MMT but are afraid to admit it? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen.

Central banks around the world are at different stages of how they supposedly deal with the COVId-19 crisis. Most are implementing some form of QE, but many are now reducing their purchases, and some are even lifting interest rates. How can they all have a different monetary approach to dealing with the same crisis? And can any claim to have been operating independently, buying up the increasing amount of debt issued by their respective governments? With the big four central banks (the BoE, the ECB, the Fed and the BoJ) having amassed $24.5 trillion in government bonds, does anybody really expect they will ever get their balance sheets back down to zero? If not, have they really embarked on MMT but are afraid to admit it? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Whilst the UK still lumbers under high COVID infection rates, and the economic recovery stalls, with GDP growth now at a trickle, the government wants to raise taxes. Even if you believed it was a fair tax, is next April – when the rise kicks in – the time to be taking spending money out of people’s pockets. But, as Phil Dobbie discusses with Prof Steve Keen, this is far from a fair tax. Those earning over £50,000 per year will pay disproportionately less than those on lower incomes. The money will help to fund the health care sector which is predominantly serviced by for-profit companies, some of whom are paying their senior staff very handsome salaries. We’re told we can expect more tax rises soon as the Tory government scrambles to reduce its debt burden. All of this ignores, of course, the ideas of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) that suggests governments can overspend if the excess money is used to create jobs. Even if you ignored MMT, doesn’t the issue of caring for the elderly, raise the obvious question about inheritance tax. Isn’t it time to tackle Britain’s problem of hereditary wealth?

There’s a lot happening with China right now. First, they are extending their social and commercial controls, which is adding uncertainty to foreign investors looking to get involved with Chinese firms. Maybe the Communist Party likes it that way. There’s also the risk that a  more cocooned China could play a stronger military role in the Asia Pacific region. Then there’s the ever-expanding debt – private and government. Hilliard MacBeth, a Debunking Economics listener asks whether private sector debt, in particular, will create a problem.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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There’s a lot happening with China right now. First, they are extending their social and commercial controls, which is adding uncertainty to foreign investors looking to get involved with Chinese firms. Maybe the Communist Party likes it that way. There’s also the risk that a  more cocooned China could play a stronger military role in the Asia Pacific region. Then there’s the ever-expanding debt – private and government. Hilliard MacBeth, a Debunking Economics listener asks whether private sector debt, in particular, will create a problem.

Following on from a fortnight ago, what happens as resources start to become scarce? We’re already seeing the short-term impact of supply chain disruption because of COVID, but what when this becomes more common, and we have to get used to the idea of not always getting what we want? Prof Steve Keen suggests that rationing of goods might be the only way forward, but Phil Dobbie asks whether a shift to a more localised service-oriented economy might cut our demand for resources, particularly if the prices become prohibitively expensive.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Premium

Following on from a fortnight ago, what happens as resources start to become scarce? We’re already seeing the short-term impact of supply chain disruption because of COVID, but what when this becomes more common, and we have to get used to the idea of not always getting what we want? Prof Steve Keen suggests that rationing of goods might be the only way forward, but Phil Dobbie asks whether a shift to a more localised service-oriented economy might cut our demand for resources, particularly if the prices become prohibitively expensive.

More students than ever are off to university next month because of the A level grade inflation, accentuated by teacher assessments replacing exam results because of COVID. How useful is it to society to have more and more people studying at university? Is it adding to the GDP of the country? In today’s podcast Steve Keen suggests that we are devaluing a university education, which helps nobody. He explains why. And Phil Dobbie suggests, for those who don’t reach university standards – or who simply don’t want to go – could another two years of A levels be the answer?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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More students than ever are off to university next month because of the A level grade inflation, accentuated by teacher assessments replacing exam results because of COVID. How useful is it to society to have more and more people studying at university? Is it adding to the GDP of the country? In today’s podcast Steve Keen suggests that we are devaluing a university education, which helps nobody. He explains why. And Phil Dobbie suggests, for those who don’t reach university standards – or who simply don’t want to go – could another two years of A levels be the answer?

We’ve talked about the climate change crisis on the Debunking Economics podcast, but there’s a broader issue we all face, highlighted in the Club of Rome back in 1972. We are chewing up resources faster than they can be renewed or sourced. It’s not just oil, but iron ore for steel production and previous metals used in microprocessors. Simon Michaux, associate professor at the Geological Survey of Finland, joins Phil Dobbie and Steve Keen to talk through the scale of the issue and how it’s already impacting the economy.

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