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There’s one clear difference between this recession and almost all those that have gone before. This time there was a pandemic involved, which hit demand and supply equally. So are there any similarities between this global recession and those that have gone before. Phil Dobbie puts the question to Steve Ken in this latest Debunking Economics podcast.

There’s one clear difference between this recession and almost all those that have gone before. This time there was a pandemic involved, which hit demand and supply equally. So are there any similarities between this global recession and those that have gone before. Phil Dobbie puts the question to Steve Ken in this latest Debunking Economics podcast.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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40 world leaders go together virtually this week, for a bit of an impromptu climate summit called by Joe Biden, before the next big climate conference (COP26) in  Glasgow in November. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast, Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether Bill Gates has the right approach. He advocates removing the green premium. His argument is, we don’t choose zero carbon emissions products because they are more expensive. If you remove this premium, then everyone will buy zero emission products and the problem will go away. Too simplistic?

40 world leaders go together virtually this week, for a bit of an impromptu climate summit called by Joe Biden, before the next big climate conference (COP26) in  Glasgow in November. In this edition of the Debunking Economics podcast, Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether Bill Gatesd has the right approach. He advocates removing the green premium. His argument is, we don’t choose zero carbon emissions products because they are more expensive. If you remove this premium, then everyone will buy zero emission products and the problem will go away. Too simplistic?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Janet Yellen has repeatedly called for countries to raise their corporate taxes, so they are in-line with the increases she has planned for the US. There’s also been a call for companies to be taxed where they earn their revenue, rather than declaring profits in countries where tax is lowest. Her reasoning is transparent, of course. She wants to raise corporate taxes in the US and doesn’t want countries to move overseas, or shift their profits out of America. Is it a good idea? Prof Steve Keen likes the idea of a coordinated approach to tax, but can’t see it happening in reality. And can you do it for corporate tax without considering other measures? Like income tax, for example. And the moment you look at a coordinated fiscal approach to that extent aren’t you are stepping dangerously close to world government?

Janet Yellen has repeatedly called for countries to raise their corporate taxes, so they are in-line with the increases she has planned for the US. There’s also been a call for companies to be taxed where they earn their revenue, rather than declaring profits in countries where tax is lowest. Her reasoning is transparent, of course. She wants to raise corporate taxes in the US and doesn’t want countries to move overseas, or shift their profits out of America. Is it a good idea? Prof Steve Keen likes the idea of a coordinated approach to tax, but can’t see it happening in reality. And can you do it for corporate tax without considering other measures? Like income tax, for example. And the moment you look at a coordinated fiscal approach to that extent aren’t you are stepping dangerously close to world government?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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You might have thought that digital currencies were the domain of cryptocurrency evangelists, and were largely stores of wealth rather than money used for transactions. Now, it seems, central banks everywhere are investigating digital currencies as part of their modus operandi. Most money in central banks is digital, of course, so when they discuss digital money what exactly are they talking about? This week Phil Dobbier talks to Prof Steve Keen about why central banks are looking more closely at digital currencies, some of it good, some of it a little more sinister.

You might have thought that digital currencies were the domain of cryptocurrency evangelists, and were largely stores of wealth rather than money used for transactions. Now, it seems, central banks everywhere are investigating digital currencies as part of their modus operandi. Most money in central banks is digital, of course, so when they discuss digital money what exactly are they talking about? This week Phil Dobbier talks to Prof Steve Keen about why central banks are looking more closely at digital currencies, some of it good, some of it a little more sinister.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Last week we looked at how economics text books that taught us the law of demand, and how fundamentally flawed it was. Today, equally as useless, the law of supply, with the supply curve representing the marginal cost of producing goods. Steve explains how its is flawed because of the assumption that as you produce more of something the cost of production rises. Phil asks, how does that relate to the idea of economies of scale? Is conventional economic theory arguing against itself?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Last week we looked at how economics text books that taught us the law of demand, and how fundamentally flawed it was. Today, equally as useless, the law of supply, with the supply curve representing the marginal cost of producing goods. Steve explains how its is flawed because of the assumption that as you produce more of something the cost of production rises. Phil asks, how does that relate to the idea of economies of scale? Is conventional economic theory arguing against itself?

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