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The US Federal reserve this week indicated that interest rates will remain close to zero through till 2023, at the earliest. Why because inflation is subdued and they don’t expect it to pick up until employment returns to normal. But what’s normal? Central banks work on the principle of NAIRU - the nonaccelerating inflation rate of unemployment – but they never seem to be able top in down exactly what that rate is. Before the pandemic US unemployment was down to 3.5 percent, with no sign of inflation lifting. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether the idea of a fixed NAIRU rate just plain wrong?

The US Federal reserve this week indicated that interest rates will remain close to zero through till 2023, at the earliest. Why because inflation is subdued and they don’t expect it to pick up until employment returns to normal. But what’s normal? Central banks work on the principle of NAIRU - the nonaccelerating inflation rate of unemployment – but they never seem to be able top in down exactly what that rate is. Before the pandemic US unemployment was down to 3.5 percent, with no sign of inflation lifting. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether the idea of a fixed NAIRU rate just plain wrong?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

There are the deniers who will argue that mankind has no influence on climate, but worse yet, there are economists who argue the impact will be so small the cost of trying to prevent it will be far greater than the consequences of living with it. That’s the line taken by joint Nobel prizewinner William Nordhaus. In this week’s edition of the Debunking Economics podcast Prof Steve Keen takes Phil Dobbie through some of the spurious arguments and assumptions used by Nordhaus to reach his spurious conclusions. Some of them defy logic. If you offered them in a high school science exam, you’d probably fail.

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There's a video of this week's podcast on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfW4R_RcyJ0

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In Japan Shinzo Abe has announced he is stepping aside because of ill health. Will this mark the end of Abenomics, the term used to describe his three-pronged approach to fighting the country’s ailing growth rate and deflation? Some point to the continued slow growth as a sign that his approach hasn’t worked, but on today’s podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie, things would have been much worse with a more conventional approach. Japan is an example of Modern Monetary Theory in action, and for those who believe pumping money into the system will create inflation like in Venezuela, why hasn’t this happened in Japan where deflation has been the biggest concern?

In Japan Shinzo Abe has announced he is stepping aside because of ill health. Will this mark the end of Abenomics, the term used to describe his three-pronged approach to fighting the country’s ailing growth rate and deflation? Some point to the continued slow growth as a sign that his approach hasn’t worked, but on today’s podcast Prof Steve Keen tells Phil Dobbie, things would have been much worse with a more conventional approach. Japan is an example of Modern Monetary Theory in action, and for those who believe pumping money into the system will create inflation like in Venezuela, why hasn’t this happened in Japan where deflation has been the biggest concern?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Governments the world over are spending like crazy to try and steer their economies through the COVID-19 crisis. Whether it’s the fiscal policies of the government or the monetary policies of the central bank, it all still revolves around using money that wasn’t around a few months ago. So how much of what is happening is described by Modern Monetary Theory – and how much more could be done if we accepted that MMT is the way things should really work. And do central banks, or treasurers really understand it? Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether MMT can solve the COVID-19 debt problem?

This is a free episode of the podcast. To hear all podcasts in full subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

We’re travelling less, staying away from the office, and spending more time at home. In the short term, it seems, those who still have money are spending a slug of it doing up their house, or moving to a bigger one, with outdoor space. House prices in the UK are growing much faster in Scotland, Wales and regional England than they are in London, for example. So, will escalating house prices be one of the consequences of COVID cocooning – and does that make the economic impact of the virus even worse than it is already? Questions Phil Dobbie puts to Prof Steve Keen in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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We’re travelling less, staying away from the office, and spending more time at home. In the short term, it seems, those who still have money are spending a slug of it doing up their house, or moving to a bigger one, with outdoor space. House prices in the UK are growing much faster in Scotland, Wales and regional England than they are in London, for example. So, will escalating house prices be one of the consequences of COVID cocooning – and does that make the economic impact of the virus even worse than it is already? Questions Phil Dobbie puts to Prof Steve Keen in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast.

The agreement by EU members to issue grants and loans to member states suffering the most from COVID-19 was a turning point for the union. Whilst US politics sees continued bickering on the size and form of a stimulus package, across the Atlantic a diverse range of countries have come together to agree a way forward. Is this a major turning point for the EU. Come we see fiscal and monetary union that could pave the way for the United States of Europe? It’s a question Phil Dobbie puts to Steve Keen in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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The agreement by EU members to issue grants and loans to member states suffering the most from COVID-19 was a turning point for the union. Whilst US politics sees continued bickering on the size and form of a stimulus package, across the Atlantic a diverse range of countries have come together to agree a way forward. Is this a major turning point for the EU. Come we see fiscal and monetary union that could pave the way for the United States of Europe? It’s a question Phil Dobbie puts to Steve Keen in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast.

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