One of the surprises as we emerge from the worst of COVIS (hopefully) is wjaty’s being called the Great Resignation. Even though employment levels in most countries remain below pre-pandemic levels, that’s not stopping those who hung onto their jobs through the crisis from leaving in their droves. So, what’s driving this trend. Prof Steve Keen suggests it’s a “kick in the balls to the gig economy”. But what happens next? Already central banks are lifting interest rates, fearful of rising wages pushing inflation higher. How is that going to work out. Tune in to this free half-hour podcast as Phil Dobbie talks to Steve about what’s driving this dramatic shift in the labour market.  

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Even the most ardent supporters of small government will agree there are times when governments need to offer subsidies to companies and industries. Paying for the furloughing of workers during the pandemic was one unavoidable example. But are their times when subsidies can distort the economy in unforeseen ways. The support for the food industry that promotes livestock over plant-based diets is a prime example. This week Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether there a better way of supporting industries without complex subsidies?  

Even the most ardent supporters of small government will agree there are times when governments need to offer subsidies to companies and industries. Paying for the furloughing of workers during the pandemic was one unavoidable example. But are their times when subsidies can distort the economy in unforeseen ways. The support for the food industry that promotes livestock over plant-based diets is a prime example. This week Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether there a better way of supporting industries without complex subsidies?  

Around the world we have seen the size of the money supply increasing considerably over recent decades, but none more so than the last couple of years, as governments spend like crazy to support people during lockdowns and illness. In the UK the amount of money in circulation has increased by almost £200 billion. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen if there are consequences of growing the monetary base so quickly, and what’s the role of the central banks in controlling this supply? 

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Around the world we have seen the size of the money supply increasing considerably over recent decades, but none more so than the last couple of years, as governments spend like crazy to support people during lockdowns and illness. In the UK the amount of money in circulation has increased by almost £200 billion. Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen if there are consequences of growing the monetary base so quickly, and what’s the orle of the central banks in controlling this supply? 

There are a lot of people questioning the direction of conventional economics, yet, even after the biggest spending splurges ever made by governments outside wartime, there is still a lot of talk about fiscal conservatism, paying back the debt and balancing the budget. But contrarian voices question whether that is the best way forward, whilst others are seeing an end to fiat money and are buying into alternatives, like Bitcoin. In this free half hour podcast Phil Dobbie and Steve Keen look at those questioning the way our economies run and the contrarians who believe there’s a better way; contrarians who don’t agree with each other.

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Is a negative trade balance such a bad thing? Some countries with a bit deficit seem to be doing okay, like American, even the UK to an extent, whereas others, like Japan have a trade surplus and a economy on the road to nowhere. This week Phil Dobbie and Steve Keen discuss how important is a trade balance for the overall good of an economy. And what about jobs? Donald Trump was concerned his trade deficit was giving away jobs to China. Was he right about that? And what about the strange suggestion from Modern Monetary Theorists that exports are bad, imports are good for an economy?

Is a negative trade balance such a bad thing? Some countries with a bit deficit seem to be doing okay, like American, even the UK to an extent, whereas others, like Japan have a trade surplus and a economy on the road to nowhere. This week Phil Dobbie and Steve Keen discuss how important is a trade balance for the overall good of an economy. And what about jobs? Donald Trump was concerned his trade deficit was giving away jobs to China. Was he right about that? And what about the strange suggestion from Modern Monetary Theorists that exports are bad, imports are good for an economy?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Economics works so well because we al have perfect information about everything, all the time. Right? We choose products at the best price because we know all about all products and their prices, so we can make the best choice. That means we can all pursue our own self-interests to provide the most efficient outcome for any situation. Huh? This week Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the myth of perfect information and the equally as convoluted theories around asymmetric information. But are we getting closer to this supposed information utopia, thanks to the internet? Or is it the supplier who is gathering perfect information, about us?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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November 20, 2021

249. Too much information

Economics works so well because we al have perfect information about everything, all  the time. Right? We choose products at the best price because we know all about all products and their prices, so we can make the best choice. That means we can all pursue our own self-interests to provide the most efficient outcome for any situation. This week Phil Dobbie talks to Steve Keen about the myth of perfect information and the equally as convoluted theories around asymmetric information. But are we getting closer to this supposed information utopia, thanks to the internet? Or is it the supplier who is gathering perfect information, about us?

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