Economists predict GDP growth by looking at business investment, government and consumer spending, plus the net level of exports. In the long term, of course, growth only comes from the products and services you sell and for that the Atlas of Economic Complexity, developed by Harvard University, is a powerful tool. It demonstrates how growth comes to countries with a highly complex mix of products for export – the less complex, the less the growth potential. As Prof Steve Keen says to Phil Dobbie in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast, it is the exact opposite of Ricardo’s argument of Comparative Advantage.

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Economists predict GDP growth by looking at business investment, government and consumer spending, plus the net level of exports. In the long term, of course, growth only comes from the products and services you sell and for that the Atlas of Economic Complexity, developed by Harvard University, is a powerful tool. It demonstrates how growth comes to countries with a highly complex mix of products for export – the less complex, the less the growth potential. As Prof Steve Keen says to Phil Dobbie in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast, it is the exact opposite of Ricardo’s argument of Comparative Advantage.

Economists love the concept of externalities - factors that cost you or benefit you, for which you made no contribution, or for which you bare no blame. In this week’s podcast Phil Dobbie describe show his new neighbour said he hopes he does his house up, because gentrification benefits everyone in the street because everyone’s house goes up in value. He asks Steve Keen whether, if that’s the case, he should charge his neighbour for some of the work, given he will benefit financially. Increasingly it’s possible to find ways that people can pay for the external benefits you receive – but, the fact that you can, does that mean that you should?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Economists love the concept of externalities - factors that cost you or benefit you, for which you made no contribution, or for which you bare no blame. In this week’s podcast Phil Dobbie describe show his new neighbour said he hopes he does his house up, because gentrification benefits everyone in the street because everyone’s house goes up in value. He asks Steve Keen whether, if that’s the case, he should charge his neighbour for some of the work, given he will benefit financially. Increasingly it’s possible to find ways that people can pay for the external benefits you receive – but, the fact that you can, does that mean that you should?

Jeremy Corbyn pledged over the weekend that, if he was to become Prime Minister, he would deliver free high-speed full-fibre broadband to everyone by 2030. To do it he would renationalise Open Reach, the network arm of BT. Is any of this a good idea? Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether the government can deliver a solution any faster than the private sector. Surely subsidies are a better approach. And can’t something be learnt from the experience in Australia, where politicking has destroyed the country’s hope of having decent broadband anytime soon. Instead, they have something that’s slower and more expensive than what Britain already has. Even if the government was to manage the roll-out – does it really need to be free? And, if we pursued the principle of Modern Monetary Theory, isn’t there a danger that we’d see more schemes like this, without the fiscal rigour that you’d expect when access to funding is more restrictive?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Jeremy Corbyn pledged over the weekend that, if he was to become Prime Minister, he would deliver free high-speed full-fibre broadband to everyone by 2030. To do it he would renationalise Open Reach, the network arm of BT. Is any of this a good idea? Phil Dobbie asks Steve Keen whether the government can deliver a solution any faster than the private sector. Surely subsidies are a better approach. And can’t something be learnt from the experience in Australia, where politicking has destroyed the country’s hope of having decent broadband anytime soon. Instead, they have something that’s slower and more expensive than what Britain already has. Even if the government was to manage the roll-out – does it really need to be free? And, if we pursued the principle of Modern Monetary Theory, isn’t there a danger that we’d see more schemes like this, without the fiscal rigour that you’d expect when access to funding is more restrictive?

For all the best efforts we have seen over recent years, the gender pay gap in most countries remains an issue. There are lots of other factors determining how much you get paid, of course – your age, your education, where you live. Can these gaps ever be resolved? Probably not, says Steve Keen, who says the issue is one of hierarchy. Society needs hierarchy to organise itself, so we will always see some getting paid more than others, even if, on the face of it, they don’t deserve it. The question is, how do people rise to the top of the hierarchy and what is the pay differential between the top and the bottom.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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For all the best efforts we have seen over recent years, the gender pay gap in most countries remains an issue. There are lots of other factors determining how much you get paid, of course – your age, your education, where you live. Can these gaps ever be resolved? Probably not, says Steve Keen, who says the issue is one of hierarchy. Society needs hierarchy to organise itself, so we will always see some getting paid more than others, even if, on the face of it, they don’t deserve it. The question is, how do people rise to the top of the hierarchy and what is the pay differential between the top and the bottom.

Steve Keen and Phil Dobbie had very different ideas about Brexit a few years ago. Now they both agree it’s a vote that should never have happened? So, is it the impact of tariffs?? Is it the impact on foreign investment? Is it impacts on the supply chain? No, many of those things, Steve believes, will be overcome. It’s the one unsurmountable thing that was never discussed ahead of the vote – the one thing that is likely to kill the whole idea. Now they agree on one thing, Brexit will never happen.

This one's free, but to hear the full version of all the Debunking Econbomics podcasts subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

One of the constraints of MMT is that to create more government money you need to have a sovereign currency. That rules out countries in the Eurozone and developing nations heavily reliant on the US dollar. Yet the idea of a Green New Deal is to resolve the issue of climate change using MMT. How can you pursue a global issue with a protocol that only applies in certain parts of the world? And how do you apply it without going down the dangerous road of world government? Questions Phil Dobbie puts to Prof Steve Keen in this week’s Debunking Economics podcast.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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