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Central banks started life as clearing houses and have evolved into instruments to, supposedly, protect the economy. But with interest rates at all time lows, often in the negative, have they gone as far as they can go? And how can they control the economy when governments can implement a fiscal approach at odds with monetary policy. Is it time to consider that Central Banks have a fuller role in the management of the economy, leaving governments to consider ow best to spend the money allocated to them? Or is that a breach of democracy? Phil Dobbie discusses the idea with Prof Steve Keen.

Central banks started life as clearing houses and have evolved into instruments to, supposedly, protect the economy. But with interest rates at all time lows, often in the negative, have they gone as far as they can go? And how can they control the economy when governments can implement a fiscal approach at odds with monetary policy. Is it time to consider that Central Banks have a fuller role in the management of the economy, leaving governments to consider ow best to spend the money allocated to them? Or is that a breach of democracy? Phil Dobbie discusses the idea with Prof Steve Keen.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a supporter at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

Artificial intelligence is everywhere it seems, except perhaps in parliament and in quite a few newspapers. But what does it mean for the future of work. Conventional economists would argue that people freed from their jobs will be able to pursue other productive outputs, helping to grow the economy still further. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether that’s likely to happen Or are we facing the danger of structural change that will lead to widening income disparity. And what can we do about it, other than becoming laggards?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Artificial intelligence is everywhere it seems, except perhaps in parliament and in quite a few newspapers. But what does it mean for the future of work. Conventional economists would argue that people freed from their jobs will be able to pursue other productive outputs, helping to grow the economy still further. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen whether that’s likely to happen Or are we facing the danger of structural change that will lead to widening income disparity. And what can we do about it, other than becoming laggards?

Today Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about Milton Friedman’s concept of nominal value ,and how this runs counter to the argument that governments can create money to give the economy a sugar hit. The theory is, we’ll realise that the extra helicopter money has devalued the currency so, after an initial burst of growth, we’ll realise that we’re actually no better off. So where does this theory go wrong? Other than the fact that most money is created by commercial banks, not governments extending their debt.

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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Today Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about Milton Friedman’s concept of nominal value ,and how this runs counter to the argument that governments can create money to give the economy a sugar hit. The theory is, we’ll realise that the extra helicopter money has devalued the currency so, after an initial burst of growth, we’ll realise that we’re actually no better off. So where does this theory go wrong? Other than the fact that most money is created by commercial banks, not governments extending their debt.

January 28, 2020

185. Davos does diddly-squat

The world leaders met at Davos and discussed climate change. Greta Thunberg told them they weren’t doing enough, even though the President of the United States promised to plant some more trees and warned against the doomsayers with their predictions of the apocalypse. So, will there be an apocalypse. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen, arguing that he could be seen as one of the lefty Marxists who is using the climate change agenda to unsettle capitalism. And if we are to avoid the apocalypse, and planting trees isn’t enough, what should we be doing. What should have been said at Davos?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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January 28, 2020

185. Davos does diddly-squat

The world leaders met at Davos and discussed climate change. Greta Thunberg told them they weren’t doing enough, even though the President of the United States promised to plant some more trees and warned against the doomsayers with their predictions of the apocalypse. So, will there be an apocalypse. Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen, arguing that he could be seen as one of the lefty Marxists who is using the climate change agenda to unsettle capitalism. And if we are to avoid the apocalypse, and planting trees isn’t enough, what should we be doing. What should have been said at Davos?

US equities, in fact shares around the world, seem to be running away with themselves right now. Is this healthy? And who wins, other than the investors who sell before the price tops out? This week Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the relationship between shareholder value and the growth and productivity of the company’s shareholders are buying in to. Is part of the problem that the system promotes the managerial class, rather than incentivises entrepreneurs?

To hear the full version subscribe by picking a plan in the right column of the Debunking Economics website (not the mobile app). Or become a patron at https://www.patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen

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US equities, in fact shares around the world, seem to be running away with themselves right now. Is this healthy? And who wins, other than the investors who sell before the price tops out? This week Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen about the relationship between shareholder value and the growth and productivity of the company’s shareholders are buying in to. Is part of the problem that the system promotes the managerial class, rather than incentivises entrepreneurs?

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