Conspiracy theorists are out there claiming that unelected representatives are holding power, using technology to control our behaviour. China has tried a bit of this social engineering, but there are those who believe its far broader than that. They also reckon the drive for us to not use cash is part of the agenda, so ‘they’ can track our behaviour. That’s why central banks (who are unelected representatives who control our behaviour) want to move to a digital currency and are against cryptocurrencies that they can’t control. This week Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if there is any potential for truth behind this fearmongering. Maybe we could all do with a bit of control!

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Conspiracy theorists are out there claiming that unelected representatives are holding power, using technology to control our behaviour. China has tried a bit of this social engineering, but there are those who believe its far broader than that. They also reckon the drive for us to not use cash is part of the agenda, so ‘they’ can track our behaviour. That’s why central banks (who are unelected representatives who control our behaviour) want to move to a digital currency and are against cryptocurrencies that they can’t control. This week Phil Dobbie asks Prof Steve Keen if there is any potential for truth behind this fearmongering. Maybe we could all do with a bit of control!

Central banks the world over are busy lifting interest rates  and, at the same time, engaging in quantitative tightening. In other words, all those bonds they bought up, will progressively be sold back to the commercial banks they were bought from. As those central bank balance sheets start to fall, what impact does it have on the economy? Does it mean we’ll see a shrinking of the money supply. That’s the commonly held belief, but, in reality the shift will have little impact, except for making banks slightly better off. The bigger concern is when they sell off corporate bonds, as Prof Steve keen explains to Phil Dobbie in this week’s podcast.

Subscribe to hear this podcast in full.

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Central banks the world over are busy lifting interest rates  and, at the same time, engaging in quantitative tightening. In other words, all those bonds they bought up, will progressively be sold back to the commercial banks they were bought from. As those central bank balance sheets start to fall, what impact does it have on the economy? Does it mean we’ll see a shrinking of the money supply. That’s the commonly held belief, but, in reality the shift will have little impact, except for making banks slightly better off. The bigger concern is when they sell off corporate bonds, as Prof Steve keen explains to Phil Dobbie in this week’s podcast.

The Tragedy of the Commons is a concept developed by William Forster Lloyd one hundred and fifty years ago. The argument is that if you allowed everybody to graze their cattle on common ground, with nobody in charge, the land would be overgrazed and the individual pursuits of many will result in destruction for all. So, do you put someone in charge, who imposes regulations on everyone. Or do you go the way of the free marketeers, who would argue that someone owns the land and rent sit out, with a vested interest in maintaining the long-term viability. Is there a definitive answer and how can we apply the Tragedy of the Commons to capitalism today? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen.

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The Tragedy of the Commons is a concept developed by William Forster Lloyd one hundred and fifty years ago. The argument is that if you allowed everybody to graze their cattle on common ground, with nobody in charge, the land would be overgrazed and the individual pursuits of many will result in destruction for all. So, do you put someone in charge, who imposes regulations on everyone. Or do you go the way of the free marketeers, who would argue that someone owns the land and rent sit out, with a vested interest in maintaining the long-term viability. Is there a definitive answer and how can we apply the Tragedy of the Commons to capitalism today? Phil Dobbie talks to Prof Steve Keen.

Central bankers and economists have often used the Phillips curve to determine the path of inflation. The problem is, they often get it wrong. No wonder then, that they question its validity when it doesn’t work the way it should. Call it operator error. On today’s podcast with Phil Dobbie, Steve Keen explains how most miss the dynamic aspects of Phillips’ observations – it’s the speed of change that counts, not a snapshot of employment levels at any particular time. Her also considered the changes in the price of inputs. On that basis, with unemployment rapidly falling and the price of imports rapidly rising, the Phillip’s curve has never been more relevant. So, does it tell us what happens next?

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Central bankers and economists have often used the Phillips curve to determine the path of inflation. The problem is, they often get it wrong. No wonder then, that they question its validity when it doesn’t work the way it should. Call it operator error. On today’s podcast with Phil Dobbie, Steve Keen explains how most miss the dynamic aspects of Phillips’ observations – it’s the speed of change that counts, not a snapshot of employment levels at any particular time. Her also considered the changes in the price of inputs. On that basis, with unemployment rapidly falling and the price of imports rapidly rising, the Phillip’s curve has never been more relevant. So, does it tell us what happens next?

Stagflation is that worrying combination of rises prices in a stagnant economy. Central banks believe the answer is to push up interest rates, to magically reduce inflation and miraculously demand returns to normal. There’s a debate as to whether that can be done without kickstarting a recession. Some argue that might be the poison pill we have to take – pointing to when Paul Volcker at the US Federal Reserve pushed interest rates as high as 21.5% , leading to recession, but ultimately seeing economic growth return. Steve Keen says this time, it’s different. And we can’t assume the inflation cycle is as transient as many politicians, economists and central bankers believe.

Become a subscriber to listen to the full version of this podcast.

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Stagflation is that worrying combination of rises prices in a stagnant economy. Central banks believe the answer is to push up interest rates, to magically reduce inflation and miraculously demand returns to normal. There’s a debate as to whether that can be done without kickstarting a recession. Some argue that might be the poison pill we have to take – pointing to when Paul Volcker at the US Federal Reserve pushed interest rates as high as 21.5% , leading to recession, but ultimately seeing economic growth return. Steve Keen says this time, it’s different. And we can’t assume the inflation cycle is as transient as many politicians, economists and central bankers believe.

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